News : October 2015

Fast Festive 5k Benefits Great Cause

Oct 21, 2015

Originally Published on Seacoast Online

By Anne Twombly

STRATHAM – For many fall is a time to reflect on the ecological beauty of the state before the warm weather dissipates. It’s only natural that The Great Bay Stewards, an organization dedicated to conservation and preservation of the New Hampshire’s Great Bay Estuary, would host their annual 5k at the apex of the season. This year the race will be held at 9 a.m. on Saturday, October 24 at Sandy Hill Road in Stratham.

The Great Bay 5K Road Race is a primary fundraiser for the Great Bay Stewards, with proceeds supporting the non-profit’s educational programs and facility maintenance. Along with facilitating erosion control efforts, invasive species removal, and runoff prevention campaigns, the non-profit also staffs the Great Bay Discovery Center, an educational hub of the Research Reserve.

Read the full story on Seacoast Online

Making the Best Choice: Local HVAC company caters to growing customer demands for sustainable options

Oct 21, 2015
Originally published in New Hampshire Business Review
 
By Michael McCord
 
At first glance, an HVAC company might not seem like an obvious promoter of sustainability, but it’s been the longtime guiding principle for Jay and Fay Aucella, co-owners of Strafford-based Aucella Heating and Cooling. 
 
Since its founding over a decade ago, Aucella Heating and Cooling has been at the forefront providing and implementing green solutions for their diverse residential and commercial client base.
 
Jay Aucella says that customers are far more knowledgeable and focused on sustainable and cost-effective measures, especially as it affects their lives.

Read the full story on New Hampshire Business Review 
 
 

Fall is Still Active Season for Wasps

Oct 14, 2015

Originally published on Seacoast Online.

By Craig Robert Brown

ELIOT, Maine – At a family outing to a nearby apple orchard they swarm around crushed apple cores, spilled cups of cider and sticky trash bins. Even with autumn’s crisp evening air, wasps are still active.

Already this fall Tom Pray, of Ecotech Pest Services in Eliot, Maine, says there have been a number of reports regarding large wasp nests both inside and outside of homes, with nests growing to the size of volleyballs and hanging like a paper lantern under an eave or porch.

Tom Pray, of Ecotech Pest Services, says an unusual growth in wasp populations is responsible for a large number of nest reports.
Ecotech Pest Control Services offers environmentally-friendly solutions for wasps, which remain active through November.
“Last year we had a bumper crop of bald face hornets and wasp nests. We’re probably seeing the result of that,” Pray said. “All those nest sites last year created new queens for this year, so a large number of them survived last winter, built large nests during the summer and seek warmth as the weather cools again.”

Read the full story on Seacoast Online.

Deconstruction: What's Old is New

Oct 14, 2015

Originally published in Taste of the Seacoast magazine.

By Craig Robert Brown

The first thing you notice about Hayseed Restaurant, a new dining venture from Smuttynose Brewing Company, is its close proximity to the popular brewery's facility in Hampton. In other words, fresh, cold, craft beer is never in short supply. The next thing you'll notice about the restaurant is that it doesn't look like a restaurant at all. Built into a Victorian-era farmhouse, Hayseed has taken sustainability to a new level, working with local farms and fisheries for its menu items, and preserving and repurposing a historic landmark that harkens back to this seaside town's farming past.

Smuttynose's 14-acre campus in Hampton was designed and built from the ground up, always with sustainability in mind. Since breaking ground on the project in 2012, Smuttynose's owner, Peter Egelston, knew he wanted to save as many of the property's original structures as possible. That included two barns and the Towle (pronounced toll) family home.

To read the full story, pick up your copy of Taste Volume 16, Number 3 wherever magazines are sold.

Making New Hampshire Beautiful Through Classroom Education and Outreach

Oct 13, 2015

Originally published in the NH Grocers Association News and Food Report

By Katelyn Monroe

MANCHESTER - School is back in session, but students aren’t the only ones returning to the classroom this fall. New Hampshire the Beautiful and the Northeast Resource Recovery Association are also heading back to schools across the state to teach students the importance of recycling and to implement lasting programs.

Through the School Recycling Club (the CLUB), both New Hampshire the Beautiful and the Northeast Resource Recovery Association work with students and educators to start and maintain new recycling programs or help improve existing programs to reduce waste and save energy in schools.

“What we really like about the program is that it’s an ongoing education that trains future generations to be more conscious of the environment and their actions,” said John Dumais, President and CEO of the N.H. Grocers Association and long-time member of New Hampshire the Beautiful's Board of Directors.

New Hampshire the Beautiful (NHtB) is a non-profit organization supported by members of the NH Soft Drink Association, the Beverage Distributors of New Hampshire Association and the New Hampshire Grocers Association. The collaboration between food and beverage companies has led to an array of programs to address litter and recycling issues and improve environmental awareness and education.

Read the full story in the October 2015 News and Food Report
 

Meet a Green Alliance Business: New Hampshire Public Televison

Oct 13, 2015

Originally Published in the Portsmouth Herald.

What: New Hampshire Public Television, the Granite State’s only statewide, locally owned television network and PBS station, offers commercial-free programming that engages viewers, connects communities, and celebrates the region in a way that entertains as well as enriches.

Headquartered in Durham, NHPTV provides locally focused programs such as “Windows to the Wild,” “Our Hometown,” “Granite State Challenge,” and special documentaries, along with PBS favorites like “Downton Abbey,” “Nature,” “Nova,” “Frontline,” “Antiques Roadshow” and PBS KIDS, offering educational services and a high-tech public safety communications infrastructure. Using five broadcast transmitters the station’s signal to 98 percent of New Hampshire homes, NHPTV reaches more than 500,000 viewers each month, and 110,000 children weekly. NHPTV’s programs are available free via over-the-air broadcast and online, not just through paid cable and satellite companies.

NHPTV also has a steadfast commitment to environmental-themed programming. From national staples like “Nature” and “Nova,” to local favorites like “Planet Granite,” to “Windows to the Wild” and special documentaries about New England’s migratory birds and the fishing industry. And NHPTV is committed to partnering with community organizations to help shine a light on the issues and topics at the forefront of public concern and discussion.

Read the full story in Portsmouth Herald here.

New Hampshire Businesses Come Together at the Just One Thing Sustainability Slam

Oct 8, 2015

Originally published on Seacoast Online

By Katelyn Monroe

AMHERST – Twelve sustainability stories by businesses from across the state will come to life at New Hampshire Businesses for Social Responsibility’s (NHBSR) Just One Thing Sustainability Slam at the LaBelle Winery on Thursday, October 15 in Amherst, New Hampshire. The evening will feature the top Just One Thing Stories, and guests will vote for the most impactful story.

NHBSR, a nonprofit membership-based organization of socially and environmentally friendly businesses, launched the Just One Thing campaign to bring together businesses from across New Hampshire to share ideas regarding sustainability and recognize businesses for their environmental, community, and workplace initiatives.

At the Sustainability Slam, guests will hear twelve winning stories, determined by a panel of sustainability experts, each in 90 seconds or less, and select the overall best stories using a polling app on their phones. Finalists were selected by a panel of experts consisting of Lisa Drake, Director of Sustainability Innovation at Stonyfield Farm, Matt Gardner, Principal of Sustainserv and Fiona Wilson, Co-Director for the Center for Social Innovation and Enterprise at the UNH Paul College of Business and Economics.  Four finalists were chosen from each category, with two large companies, and two small companies or organizations in each category:

  • Environmental Initiatives, Large company: Hannaford and Coca Cola Bottling of Northern New England
  • Environmental Initiatives, Small Company: Grappone Conference Center and Sequoya Technologies
  • Community Initiatives, Large Company: Mondanock Paper Mills and Keene State College
  • Community Initiatives, Small Company: Brown & Company and LifeWise Community Projects
  • Workplace Initiatives, Large Company: Timberland and Goodwill Industries of Northern New England
  • Workplace Initiatives, Small Company: W.S. Badger and Image 4

Read the rest on Seacoast Online.

Fall is Still Active Season for Wasps

Oct 7, 2015

Originally published on Patch.com

By Craig Robert Brown

ELIOT, Maine - At a family outing to a nearby apple orchard they swarm around crushed apple cores, spilled cups of cider and sticky trash bins. Even with autumn’s crisp evening air, wasps are still active.

Already this fall Tom Pray, of Ecotech Pest Services in Eliot, Maine, says there have been a number of reports regarding large wasp nests both inside and outside of homes, with nests growing to the size of volleyballs and hanging like a paper lantern under an eave or porch.

“Last year we had a bumper crop of bald face hornets and wasp nests. We’re probably seeing the result of that,” Pray said. “All those nest sites last year created new queens for this year, so a large number of them survived last winter, built large nests during the summer and seek warmth as the weather cools again.”

Homeowners can take some minor precautions themselves by walking their property both inside and out to check for nests, which remain active until mid-November.

Read the full story on Patch.com.

Antrim Wind Farm to Get a Second Shot at State Approval

Oct 7, 2015

Originally published and broadcast on NHPR

By Sam Evans Brown

A proposal to construct 9 large wind turbines in Southwestern New Hampshire will be allowed to go before state regulators again. The Site Evaluation Committee has decided the previously rejected Antrim wind farm has changed its proposal enough to get a second chance.

Eolian Renewable Energy’s original proposal for the Antrim wind farm was for ten-turbines, and to produce 30 megawatts on the windiest days. State Regulators rejected the project in 2013 because of the aesthetic impact it would have had on the region.

Now the company has proposed eliminating one turbine, and making another about 46 feet shorter, and using more powerful turbines in the remaining nine so the project will still generate nearly 29 megawatts.

Read or listen to the full story on NHPR.org.

When Giving Back Is Part of Company Culture

Oct 7, 2015
Originally Published in The Square
 
By Craig Robert Brown
 
Brad Paige is reserved, leaning over a table at Block Six, the restaurant and bar inside Portsmouth’s 3S Artspace, competing to be heard against the sound of the kitchen and wait staff preparing for the dinner rush. It’s noisy but in that business-is-good kind of way.
 
Paige, dressed in a button-down shirt, suit, close-cropped hair and conservative glasses is modest about Kennebunk Savings’ successful Community Promise program, which gives back 10 percent of the bank’s earnings to nonprofits such as 3S.
 
Though the program precedes Paige’s tenure as CEO — it started in 1995 while Paige has been the CEO since 2009 — it was Paige’s leadership during the peak of the economic downturn his first year that kept it as a priority within the company.
 
“In 2009 we technically didn’t have any money to give out,” Paige says. “We had a rainy day fund, so we still gave out $400,000 but that’s compared to the $700,000 we had done the year before.”
 
To counter the reduction in monetary funding, Paige, an avid volunteer and mentor throughout most of his life, conceived of an idea to add volunteerism as part of the bank’s giveback program.
 
Read the rest on The Square

Grant to Help Great Bay Stewards Protect Estuary

Oct 7, 2015

Originally Published in the Portsmouth Herald

GREENLAND – Great Bay is an essential part of what makes living on the Seacoast unique, but pollution from increasing development threatens the estuary's ecosystem.

The Great Bay Stewards is dedicated to protecting the bay and a recent grant will assists its efforts. The New England Grassroots Environment Fund provided the stewards with a “Grow Grant,” which will support the stewards’ recent effort in joining the Soak Up the Rain program of the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services.

The grant will specifically fund a mailing designed to educate residents about improving water quality, provide potential leads for the Soak Up the Rain Great Bay and increase the stewards' membership. The mailing will also let homeowners know they can receive a step-by-step guide to make their landscapes more environmentally safe from pollutants and runoff.

Read the full story at Seacoast Online.

New Hampshire Businesses Come Together at the Just One Thing Sustainability Slam

Oct 7, 2015

Originally Published on Patch.com

By Katelyn Monroe

AMHERST - Twelve sustainability stories by businesses from across the state will come to life at New Hampshire Businesses for Social Responsibility’s (NHBSR) Just One Thing Sustainability Slam at the LaBelle Winery on Thursday, October 15 in Amherst, New Hampshire. The evening will feature the top Just One Thing Stories, and guests will vote for the most impactful story.

NHBSR, a nonprofit membership-based organization of socially and environmentally friendly businesses, launched the Just One Thing campaign to bring together businesses from across New Hampshire to share ideas regarding sustainability and recognize businesses for their environmental, community, and workplace initiatives.

Fall Programs are in Full Swing at the Gundalow Company

Oct 6, 2015

Originally published on Seacoast Online

By Katelyn Monroe

PORTSMOUTH – With autumn well underway, tourists have packed up their beach chairs, vacated summer cottages, and headed home. As the heat of the summer slips into memory, there are still plenty of warm days left for locals to get outside and enjoy fall in New Hampshire. One of the more popular ways to take in fall’s changing scenery is sailing along the Piscataqua River aboard a replica historic gundalow vessel, unique to the Seacoast region. The Gundalow Company, which operates regular educational and public sails, is open through the last week of October.

Portsmouth's Gundalow Company offers educational public, school, and fall foliage sails through the end of October.
Established in 2002, the Gundalow Company provides a fun and educational experience for thousands of school children and adults. Today the Gundalow Company continues to carry out their mission – to protect the Piscataqua Region’s maritime heritage and environment through education and action on their newest gundalow replica, the Piscataqua.

“We built this boat for the community and want it to be thought of as a resource for local kids and families,” said Molly Bolster, Gundalow Company Executive Director.

Read the full story on Seacoast Online.

FootGolf Gives Local Soccer Team Dynamic Edge

Oct 6, 2015
Originally published on Patch.com
 
By Anne Twombly
 
NORTH HAMPTON - Mini golf is a classic American pastime, a simplified and strategically edited version of golf’s traditional gameplay. Whereas traditional golf involves a large sprawling natural landscape, a spectrum of varied clubs, and heavily technical gameplay, mini golf is played in a shrunken, often fantastical, manufactured course allowing for faster paced game transitions between erratic swings of a one-size fits all standardized club. A concentrated dose of the marketable highlights of the traditional golf experience, mini golf aims to please the masses.
 
Like mini golf, FootGolf, an up-and-coming hybrid of soccer and golf, borrows the latter’s perceived highlights. However, contrary to the aspects hailed in mini golf, a Foot Golf course traditionally runs within or directly parallel to a traditional golf course.
 

Fast Festive 5k Benefits Great Cause

Oct 6, 2015
Originally published on Patch.com
 
By Anne Twombly
 
STRATHAM - For many fall is a time to reflect on the ecological beauty of the state before the warm weather dissipates. It’s only natural that The Great Bay Stewards, an organization dedicated to conservation and preservation of the New Hampshire’s Great Bay Estuary, would host their annual 5k at the apex of the season. This year the race will be held at 9 a.m. on Saturday, October 24 at Sandy Hill Road in Stratham.
 
The Great Bay 5K Road Race is a primary fundraiser for the Great Bay Stewards, with proceeds supporting the non-profit’s educational programs and facility maintenance. Along with facilitating erosion control efforts, invasive species removal, and runoff prevention campaigns, the non-profit also staffs the Great Bay Discovery Center, an educational hub of the Research Reserve. 
 

Green Collar Careers: Priscilla Lane-Rondeau, 900 Degrees Neapolitan Pizzeria

Oct 5, 2015

Originally published on Seacoast Online.

Voted Best Gourmet Pizza by N.H. Magazine six years in a row, it’s definitely worth checking out 900 Degrees Neapolitan Pizzeria at either of their two locations, the newest location in Epping and the original in Manchester N.H. Owner Priscilla Lane-Rondeau is dedicated to providing her customers with the best wood-fired pizza around while simultaneously promoting green business practices and giving back to her local community. Using fresh, organic ingredients when possible and a wood fire oven that cooks Neapolitan-style pizza at an average temperature of 900 degrees Fahrenheit, 900 Degrees serves pizza prepared in the traditional style native to Naples, Italy. In addition to their award-winning pizza, the menu also boasts mouth-watering appetizers, soups, sandwiches, entrees and desserts.

Priscilla Lane-Rondeau is the owner of 900 Degrees, a local pizzeria with two locations, who loves making pizza and promoting sustainability.
After sixteen years working as an Employee Assistance Profession (EAP), Lane- Rondeau decided she wanted to do something different and bring delicious, authentic Italian food to her community. For her entire life, Lane-Rondeau has been dedicated to living sustainably. When she conceived the idea for 900 Degrees with a friend who had restaurant experience in 2007, it was never a question for Lane-Rondeau that the business would be green as well.

900 Degrees conducts sustainable business practices by using LED and motion sensor lighting throughout the restaurant, utilizing low-flow kitchen appliances, and supplying guests with water only upon request. They have a comprehensive recycling program, use green-certified cleaning products, and have reduced waste by over 50 percent since opening.

Read the full story on Seacoast Online.

Ecotech Pest Services Still Pursuing Wasps

Oct 5, 2015

Originally published in Foster's Daily Democrat

By Craig Brown

ELIOT, Maine - At a family outing to a nearby apple orchard they swarm around crushed apple cores, spilled cups of cider and sticky trash bins. Even with autumn’s crisp evening air, wasps are still active.

This fall Tom Pray, of Ecotech Pest Services in Eliot, Maine, says there have been a number of reports regarding large wasp nests both inside and outside of homes, with nests growing to the size of volleyballs and hanging like a paper lantern under an eave or porch.

"Last year we had a bumper crop of bald face hornets and wasp nests. We're probably seeing the result of that," Pray said. "All those nest sites last year created new queens for this year, so a large number of them survived last winter, built large nests during the summer and seek warmth as the weather cools again."

Read the full story on Foster's Online.