News : February 2015

Green Collar Careers: Green Maids Owner, Johnmark O'Brien

Feb 27, 2015

Originally published in The New Hampshire.

By Anna Murphy

Johnmark O’Brien, owner of Green Maids, has been cleaning up grime since 2009. O’Brien started his green cleaning company with the mission to keep harmful chemicals out of the community and local environment’s waste-stream. It was a mission O’Brien embarked upon while a college student. Based in York Harbor, Maine, Green Maids now services the New Hampshire seacoast as well as southern Maine.

To ensure his company promotes and uses only the best products, O’Brien conducted years of research on the dangers of household cleaning products and the chemicals they release into the air, water and soil. He has also developed a highly effective Green Clean process that removes dirt and household pollutants and is safe for humans and animals. All cleaning products used by Green Maids must either be Green Seal Certified or guaranteed to be all natural, biodegradable, earth friendly, non-toxic and safe for home and office use. Green Maids uses only products that have not been tested on animals and come from environmentally responsible manufacturers and retailers. The Green Maids cleaning team makes their rounds in a Toyota Prius hybrid.

In addition to their eco-friendly cleaning practices, Green Maids actively gives back to its community, conducting three to four beach clean-ups each year. With sustainability at the forefront of each decision he makes, O’Brien says that every action taken, no matter how small, builds toward a greener future.

Read the full story, on page 8, on issuu.com here!

New Green Housing Development Replaces Decayed Public Housing

Feb 24, 2015

Originally posted in the Portsmouth Herald and on Fosters.com

By Ken Johnson

PORTSMOUTH – A decayed public housing development has been replaced by a new affordable green town house and apartment complex thanks to Petersen Engineering; a Portsmouth-based engineering firm that specializes in energy efficient mechanical engineering.

Built in 1951, Fairfax Gardens was a 150 unit public housing development in Taunton, Massachusetts that had fallen into disrepair. The development was cramped, not accessible nor energy-efficient. The units were overrun with mold and pests, and their finishes were severely deteriorated. According to an evaluation prepared by The UMass Dartmouth Urban Initiative, drug sales and use were also a large problem at Fairfax Gardens. Shortly after this evaluation, under a HOPE VI Revitalization Grant, the complex was demolished and, along with undeveloped land Parcel 6-A a mile away, was rebuilt into a green affordable housing complex.

Local Group Proposes Ordinance on Single-Use Plastics

Feb 23, 2015

Originally posted on Fosters.com.

By Michael Bizier

PORTSMOUTH – On February 3, the New Hampshire chapter of the Surfrider Foundation’s Rise Above Plastics (RAP) coalition proposed a reduction of single-use plastic bags to the Portsmouth City Council. The ordinance, which aims at reducing plastics pollution, is currently awaiting votes before it is brought before the council for final ruling.

Formed in 1984, the Surfrider Foundation is a non-profit, nation-wide organization aimed at protecting the world’s oceans, waves, and beaches, The NH chapter was formed in 2007 and is involved in monthly beach clean-ups, removing anywhere from 50-90 pounds of trash from the shoreline. In March 2013, the NH chapter formed the RAP coalition with several groups and businesses including Green Alliance, Zero Waste Portsmouth, Seacoast Science Center, Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation, and The Gundalow Company. Both The Gundalow Company and the Blue Ocean Society are Business Partners with the Green Alliance, a union of businesses and consumers educating the public about the goods and services they use, and encourage more sustainable choices. The GA represents over 100 local green-leaning businesses and has put its weight behind the ordinance to reduce single-use plastic bags in Portsmouth and is using its bullhorn to educate and advocate around the issue.

Read the full story on Fosters.com here.

Local Business to host Extreme Weather and Business Preparedness Forum

Feb 23, 2015

Originally published on Fosters.com.

PORTSMOUTH – In 2005, Hampton fire chief Chris Silver surveyed local businesses on whether or not they had an extreme weather plan. An astounding two-thirds of all businesses surveyed had no plan, while five out 10 said their business operations couldn’t afford to be down for more than five days without suffering significant loss to profits and employees.

It’s clear that extreme weather is a serious issue especially for business. It’s also clear that more frequent and severe storms have now become a fact of life in the region and are a result, at least in part, of climate change.

The Green Alliance, a local organization that works to promote and unite sustainable businesses and individuals across the region, will be hosting a free and open Business Preparedness Forum on March 12 from 6-8:00 p.m. at their office on 75 Congress St, Suite 304, Portsmouth to discuss some of these issues. The forum will be held in conjunction with the American Red Cross and the NH Coastal Adaptation Workgroup, an organization that works to help communities learn about and use existing resources to prepare for extreme weather and the effects of climate change.

Read the full story on Fosters.com here.

A Legacy of Sustainable Change

Feb 23, 2015

Originally published on Fosters.com.

PORTSMOUTH – A local downtown establishment is up for sale, but the current owner's legacy of bringing green and sustainable products to the Seacoast is expected to live on. Holly Landgarten, the owner of Prelude “purveyors of imported soaps, fine jewelry & gifts” on Market Street, is putting the store up for sale.

“I've been here nearly 26 years, which is wonderful and it's the longest time I've ever worked anywhere,” Landgarten said. “I would love to still work here as an employee but I need not to work as many hours or have as much responsibility.”

Prelude is a different store than when Landgarten first bought it from Florence 'Fa' Vereen in May of 1998.

Prelude was founded by Thom Lager in April of 1983, who also founded many candle shops in the seacoast. Prelude was different from his candle stores since it carried bath, body and gift items. He also opened a second Prelude in Newburyport, Massachusetts, that closed about 15 years ago.

Read the full story on Fosters.com here.

Meet a Green Alliance Business: Poco's Bow Street Cantina

Feb 23, 2015

Originally published in Portsmouth Herald and Seacoast Online.

What: As one of the Seacoast's longest operating family-owned restaurants, Poco's Bow Street Cantina offers all-natural, sustainable menu options and stunning views of the Piscataqua River from its decks and energy-efficient dining room. Established more than 33 years ago at 47 Bow St., husband and wife co-owners, John Golumb and Marlisa Geroulo, have turned Poco's and its sister restaurant, Two Ceres Street, into staples of sustainable dining.

Over the years, Golumb has made significant upgrades to Poco's heating energy systems installing an efficient fireplace, a new heat pump system and an energy-efficient furnace for its outdoor lower deck. And during the renovation of Poco's kitchen, Golumb added a more efficient ventilation system to keep the workspace cool during the summer months. Golumb also switched the restaurant's lighting to CFL lightbulbs and installed indoor and outdoor light sensors to reduce energy waste. Golumb also maintains a strict recycling policy at Poco's where all spent materials, including paper, plastic, metal and frying oil, are properly recycled. Additionally, all food scraps are composted and all to-go containers are made of corn-based sustainable materials that can be composted. Golumb and Geroulo advocate supporting farms and agriculture with locally sourced menu items at Poco's, which is also a proud member of Seacoast Eat Local, and include vegan, vegetarian and gluten free options.

Read the full story on Seacoast Online here.

Local Business to host Extreme Weather and Business Preparedness Forum March 12th

Feb 19, 2015

Originally published on Portsmouth Patch and Foster's Daily Democrat. 

By Mike Bizier

PORTSMOUTH – In 2005, Hampton fire chief Chris Silver surveyed local businesses on whether or not they had an extreme weather plan. An astounding two-thirds of all businesses surveyed had no plan, while five out 10 said their business operations couldn’t afford to be down for more than five days without suffering significant loss to profits and employees.

It’s clear that extreme weather is a serious issue especially for business. It’s also clear that more frequent and severe storms have now become a fact of life in the region and are a result, at least in part, of climate change.

The Green Alliance, a local organization that works to promote and unite sustainable businesses and individuals across the region, will be hosting a free and open Business Preparedness Forum on March 12 from 6-8:00 p.m. at their office on 75 Congress St, Suite 304, Portsmouth to discuss some of these issues. The forum will be held in conjunction with the American Red Cross and the NH Coastal Adaptation Workgroup, an organization that works to help communities learn about and use existing resources to prepare for extreme weather and the effects of climate change. 

Read the full story on Patch here and Foster's here.  

Sustainability Common Thread Between Two Local Entrepreneurs

Feb 19, 2015

Originally published on Seacoast Online.

By Mark Quirk

PORTSMOUTH — When Bill Buckley and Tom Pray met it was nothing short of fate in every sense. The two, both owners of local businesses, found an instant connection in their backgrounds, beliefs and common core values of sustainability. The timing was perfect too. Bill wanted to train in karate (which Tom teaches), while Tom wanted to practice the Taiji and Qigong that Bill is passionate in teaching. Now they both offer their services, as well as yoga, under one roof at Gateway Taiji, Qigong & Yoga studio on 875 Islington St. It’s a sort of one stop shop for martial arts and meditative healing based exercise.

“This is unique,” said Pray, who has been teaching Shotokan Karate since 1987. “You don’t find that blend of teaching anywhere.”

Gateway Taiji, Qigong and Yoga is a center for practicing and exploring the ancient energy arts. Its large studio provides a spacious, sunlit, inviting environment for ongoing classes and special seminars in a renovated mill building. A major focus of the renovation was to improve energy efficiency. The original concrete and asphalt roof was replaced with a lightweight foam and rubber solution. The exterior walls were filled with the same foam. These improvements are expected to substantially lower the building’s heating costs. The lights in the new studio are all LED, further reducing the energy footprint of the building. The space also operates on solar power. Last but not least, students learn and practice in 100 year old historical site given new purpose and life.

Read the full story on Seacoast Online here

Local Group Proposes Ordinance on Single-Use Plastics

Feb 19, 2015

Originally published on Portsmouth Patch and Foster's Daily Democrat.

By Mike Bizier

PORTSMOUTH – On February 3, the New Hampshire chapter of the Surfrider Foundation’s Rise Above Plastics (RAP) coalition proposed a reduction of single-use plastic bags to the Portsmouth City Council. The ordinance, which aims at reducing plastics pollution, is currently awaiting votes before it is brought before the council for final ruling.

Formed in 1984, the Surfrider Foundation is a non-profit, nation-wide organization aimed at protecting the world’s oceans, waves, and beaches, The NH chapter was formed in 2007 and is involved in monthly beach clean-ups, removing anywhere from 50-90 pounds of trash from the shoreline. In March 2013, the NH chapter formed the RAP coalition with several groups and businesses including Green Alliance, Zero Waste Portsmouth, Seacoast Science Center, Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation, and The Gundalow Company. Both The Gundalow Company and the Blue Ocean Society are Business Partners with the Green Alliance, a union of businesses and consumers educating the public about the goods and services they use, and encourage more sustainable choices. The GA represents over 100 local green-leaning businesses and has put its weight behind the ordinance to reduce single-use plastic bags in Portsmouth and is using its bullhorn to educate and advocate around the issue. 

Read the full story on Patch here and Foster's here. 

New Green Housing Development Replaces Decayed Public Housing

Feb 18, 2015

Originally published on Portsmouth Patch and Fosters.com

By Ken Johnson

PORTSMOUTH, N.H. – A decayed public housing development has been replaced by a new affordable green town house and apartment complex thanks to Petersen Engineering; a Portsmouth-based engineering firm that specializes in energy efficient mechanical engineering.

Built in 1951, Fairfax Gardens was a 150 unit public housing development in Taunton, Massachusetts that had fallen into disrepair. The development was cramped, not accessible nor energy-efficient. The units were overrun with mold and pests, and their finishes were severely deteriorated. According to an evaluation prepared by The UMass Dartmouth Urban Initiative, drug sales and use were also a large problem at Fairfax Gardens. Shortly after this evaluation, under a HOPE VI Revitalization Grant, the complex was demolished and, along with undeveloped land Parcel 6-A a mile away, was rebuilt into a green affordable housing complex.

“When you look at what this property used to be and what it has become, it’s nothing short of a total transformation. The residents deserve to have a place that is safe, energy efficient and high performing – that’s the kind of building we specialize in and we are very proud to have contributed to this project,” says James Petersen, principle engineer and founder of Petersen Engineering. The $71 million new development, consists of 160 mixed-income units, with 88 new townhouses at Bristol Gardens built on the old Fairfax Gardens site and 72 new apartment units and townhouses at Lenox Green built on Parcel 6-A. The new development has 20 buildings in total, including a community center and a maintenance building.

Read the full story on Patch here or Fosters.com here.

Green Collar Careers: Johnmark O’Brien of Green Maids

Feb 17, 2015

Originally posted on Seacoast Online Blogs.

By Anna Murphy

Johnmark O’Brien, owner of Green Maids, has been cleaning up grime since 2009. O’Brien started his green cleaning company with the mission to keep harmful chemicals out of the community and local environment’s waste-stream. It was a mission O’Brien embarked upon while a college student. Based in York Harbor, Maine, Green Maids now services the New Hampshire seacoast as well as southern Maine.

To ensure his company promotes and uses only the best products, O’Brien conducted years of research on the dangers of household cleaning products and the chemicals they release into the air, water and soil. He has also developed a highly effective Green Clean process that removes dirt and household pollutants and is safe for humans and animals. All cleaning products used by Green Maids must either be Green Seal Certified or guaranteed to be all natural, biodegradable, earth friendly, non-toxic and safe for home and office use. Green Maids uses only products that have not been tested on animals and come from environmentally responsible manufacturers and retailers. The Green Maids cleaning team makes their rounds in a Toyota Prius hybrid.

In addition to their eco-friendly cleaning practices, Green Maids actively gives back to its community, conducting three to four beach clean-ups each year. With sustainability at the forefront of each decision he makes, O’Brien says that every action taken, no matter how small, builds toward a greener future.

Read the full story on Seacoast Online Blogs here.

Sustainability is at Local Bottling Company's Core

Feb 17, 2015

Originally posted on Portsmouth Patch.

By Craig Robert Brown

LONDONDERRY - You may have seen your name on a can or bottle of Coca-Cola. It’s part of the company’s Share a Coke campaign. And during the holidays, those familiar polar bears are on television screens and aluminum cans across the globe. But what happens to those bottles and cans once they’re empty? For its part here in New Hampshire, Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Northern New England (CCNNE), an independent bottler, ensures they’re doing more than just talking about recycling programs.

CCNNE’s sustainability manager, Ray Dube, knows what you’re going to say about the brand before you do. He’s heard it all before; that some people have a perception that Coca-Cola is harmful to the planet because of the plastic it manufactures, or all the water used in the bottling plants, or the emissions given off by delivery trucks. But Dube doesn’t shy away from those perceptions. He recognizes that yes, as a large manufacturing company, CCNNE is responsible for having an impact on the environment. That’s why Dube travels across the region to schools, college campuses, public events and various conferences to educate people about the many sustainable initiatives CCNNE has taken to counter that impact over the last 18 years.

Read the full story on Patch here

Meet a Green Alliance Business: Climate Counts

Feb 16, 2015

Originally published on Seacoast Online.

Who: Climate Counts

What: Originally germinated as an idea from Stonyfield Farm's co-founder Gary Hirschberg in 2007, Climate Counts has become an internationally recognized nonprofit committed to bringing consumers and high-profile companies together to address the negative effects of climate change.

The founding principle behind the cutting edge organization has always been the concept of an informed and engaged public. Because climate change is widely debated politically, Climate Counts decided the best way to bring change to the private sector was to showcase those companies that make a focused effort to be more environmentally conscious. To that end, Climate Counts scores some of the world's largest, most recognizable companies, like Coca-Cola, Nike, Amazon and more, to bring the consumer a transparent look at the efforts these companies make to offset their carbon footprints.

Using Climate Counts’ score-sheet, the consumer has the power to send companies a message via the power of the purse. And Climate Counts takes an optimistic outlook on climate change, forging partnerships where each side has a stake in pursuing real, long-lasting change, over the negative reporting often associated with the debate. Climate Counts also knows that to secure a future with lower greenhouse gas emissions, it must reach the next generation of environmental stewards. That's why the nonprofit collaborates with the University of New Hampshire's Sustainability Institute to provide students with an in-depth look at how they can further the cause and hold large companies accountable for their actions.

Read the full story on Seacoast Online here.

RiverWorks Find Synergy On The Bus

Feb 16, 2015

Originally published on Fosters and Fosters.com.

By Kristyn Lak Miller

GREENLAND – Each day, roughly 1,785 people rely on COAST’s fleet of 24 buses and trolleys to get where they’re going throughout the Seacoast region. And the Cooperative Alliance for Seacoast Transportation (COAST) works with RiverWorks Printing for much of its strategic, and sustainable, printing needs. Working together since 2009, these two local businesses strive to save the planet while also saving seacoast residents money.

“As a sustainable transportation provider, it’s very meaningful for us to work with like-minded businesses that are focused on increasing the sustainability of their business operations,” says Rad Nichols, Executive Director for COAST. “RiverWorks is a reliable and professional partner. They’ve been very accommodating in meeting our unique printing and installation needs, and they stand behind their work, which has been of the highest quality.”

Greenland-based RiverWorks Printing was founded in 2009 and has worked on many projects with ATA (Alternate Transit Advertising), which focuses on exterior bus advertising aimed at helping raise money for 13 public transit systems throughout New England, including COAST. It was through ATA, that RiverWorks was introduced to COAST.

Read the full story on Fosters.com here.

Rochester Company Paves way for Local App Market

Feb 12, 2015

Originally published on Foster's Daily Democrat and Portsmouth Patch.

By Mike Bizier

ROCHESTER- It’s estimated that more than 90 percent of all Americans own a smartphone, a massive consumption that has created a strong demand for mobile technology, and it's easy to see why. Mobile apps offer businesses an advantage in a variety of ways, ranging from analytics to customer-relations management, and even easing collaboration and human resource services. Gartner Inc., a leading technology and advising company, predicts by late 2015, there will be 4.9 billion devices connected to the Internet, an increase of 30 percent from 2014.

New Hampshire entrepreneur Alex Bakman started up his company SnAPPii in 2011 to bring Android and iOS apps to the local business level and help smaller businesses compete in the 21st century.

“My motivation was to solve some of the problems of mobile app development,” Bakman says. “I realize that people need about a gazillion apps because, as the Apple commercial goes, ‘there is an app for that.' We now live in a world where there is a growing sense that each of us does indeed need an app for everything. Businesses that can meet this demand are finding handsome rewards in profits.” 

Read the full story on Foster's here and on Portsmouth Patch here

Sustainability is at Local Bottling Company's Core

Feb 12, 2015

Originally published on Seacoast Online.

By Craig Robert Brown

You may have seen your name on a can or bottle of Coca-Cola. It’s part of the company’s Share a Coke campaign. And during the holidays, those familiar polar bears are on television screens and aluminum cans across the globe. But what happens to those bottles and cans once they’re empty? For its part here in New Hampshire, Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Northern New England (CCNNE), an independent bottler, ensures they’re doing more than just talking about recycling programs.

CCNNE’s sustainability manager, Ray Dube, knows what you’re going to say about the brand before you do. He’s heard it all before; that some people have a perception that Coca-Cola is harmful to the planet because of the plastic it manufactures, or all the water used in the bottling plants, or the emissions given off by delivery trucks. But Dube doesn’t shy away from those perceptions. He recognizes that yes, as a large manufacturing company, CCNNE is responsible for having an impact on the environment. That’s why Dube travels across the region to schools, college campuses, public events and various conferences to educate people about the many sustainable initiatives CCNNE has taken to counter that impact over the last 18 years.

Read the full story on Seacoast Online here. 

Green Collar Careers: Cornerstone Tree Care Owner, Micum Davis

Feb 11, 2015

Originally published in The New Hampshire.

by Anna Murphy

Some equate Micum Davis, owner of Cornerstone Tree Care, to the Lorax.  Much like Dr. Seuss's lovable character.  Davis always does what is best for the environment and the trees with which he works.  At 38, Davis has already amassed a wealth of knowledge in the proper techniques to service trees and maintain their long-term health.

Because every tree has a unique form, Davis studies their basic structure before making his first move.  From limbs interfering with power lines, trees blocking roads and walkways to injuries and property damage, trees can cause serious and life-threatening problems.  Pruning eliminates existing hazards while preemptive work -- removing dead or weak limbs -- can help prevent damage during storms.  In order to protect the trees from damage during pruning, Davis and his employees use a system of rope knots and belays to scale the trees without damaging the bark or using spikes in what he refers to as an "aerial circus act."

Read the full story, on page 15, on issuu.com here!

900 Degrees Pizzeria Gets Clean while Staying Green

Feb 10, 2015

Originally posted on Seacoast Online.

By Anna Murphy

EPPING – 900 Degrees Neapolitan Pizzeria, located in Manchester and a second location in Epping, has been a paragon of sustainable business practices for the past seven years. There is a sense of sustainability from the moment you walk in, be it the reclaimed, efficient décor, the fresh food made with organic ingredients whenever possible, or now, the use of all green certified cleaning products.

The pizzeria strives to lessen its environmental impact whenever possible. A Green Alliance member, 900 Degrees owner Priscilla Lane-Rondeau has held sustainable living close to her heart for her entire life.

“For me, going green is always my first choice,” said Lane-Rondeau. “I truly believe in it.”

Recently, 900 Degrees made the switch to cleaning with green certified cleaning supplies, thereby keeping the harsh chemicals found in most commercial-grade cleaning products off the table tops, out of the kitchen and out of their waste-stream.

Read the full story on Seacoast Online here. 

Meet a Green Alliance Business: Jenaly Technology Group

Feb 9, 2015

Originially published on Seacoast Online.

Who: Jenaly Technology Group

What: Founded on the premise of providing affordable IT solutions for businesses big and small, Jenaly stands out from the industry with its commitment to sustainability and environmentally friendly technology choices. Jenaly provides virtual system administration management services, which provide remote and continuous monitoring and maintenance programs for a business’ IT infrastructure. VSA is just one method of reducing a business’ demand for electricity, lowering costs and its need to upgrade as frequently thus reducing the amount of eWaste a company generates.

In addition to reducing eWaste, Jenaly partners with local, environmentally conscious recycler, MetalWave, to help clients responsibly dispose of old technology. Jenaly also has an effective document management system that reduces the amount of paper required by an individual, business or firm, with the goal to become 100 percent digital. Jenaly educates clients to go green with their IT by utilizing solid ink – a toxin and cartridge-free ink – printing technologies, which are far more environmentally friendly and far less wasteful.

Read the full story on Seacoast Online here.

Ultra Green Geothermal

Feb 6, 2015

Originally published in Coastal Home.

By Herb Perry

A local company takes sustainability as far as it can go, enabling Seacoast-area owners of new and existing homes to heat and cool their homes with clean, renewable -- and ultimately affordable -- geothermal energy.

Ultra Geothermal Inc. of Barrington, New Hampshire, has installed more than 750 geothermal systems in southern Maine, Seacoast New Hampshire, and northern Massachusetts. And the finest example of Ultra Geothermal's sustainability ethos is the Strafford home of company owner Melissa Abo, which can only be described as "over-the-top green."

While most green builders take such steps as installing Energy Star appliances and high-efficiency gas furnaces, Aho went further. She built her home to the National Green building Standard ICC700 (NGBS), which includes ensuring optimum thermal resistance. She also installed a vertical closed-loop geothermal system and a ground-mounted solar PV 5.6-kilowatt-hour array. Outdoors, rain barrels collect water for reuse on her flower gardens.

To read the rest of the story pick up the Winter 2015 edition of Coastal Home at your nearest newstand!

Local Companies Work Together to Better Seacoast, Planet

Feb 5, 2015

Originally posted on Portsmouth Patch. 

By Kristyn Lak Miller 

GREENLAND – Each day, roughly 1,785 people rely on COAST’s fleet of 24 buses and trolleys to get where they’re going throughout the seacoast region. And the Cooperative Alliance for Seacoast Transportation (COAST) works with RiverWorks Printing for much of its strategic, and sustainable, printing needs. Working together since 2009, these two local businesses strive to save the planet while also saving seacoast residents money.

“As a sustainable transportation provider, it’s very meaningful for us to work with like-minded businesses that are focused on increasing the sustainability of their business operations,” says Rad Nichols, Executive Director for COAST. “RiverWorks is a reliable and professional partner. They’ve been very accommodating in meeting our unique printing and installation needs, and they stand behind their work, which has been of the highest quality.” 

Environmental Diaper Service Company Expands to All Laundry

Feb 3, 2015

Orinigally posted on Seacoast Online.

By Patrick Haigis

EPPING – Green Earth Baby Works has an established reputation as an alternative to plastic-based disposable diapers. In conjunction with their online and brick-and-mortar stores, which sell cloth diapers and natural cleaning products for diapers, the environmentally conscious business also offers a diaper cleaning service. Green Earth Baby Works will pick up participating clients’ dirty cloth diapers, clean them, and return them good as new. For years, they have been successful as an environmentally friendly cleaning service. Now, by popular demand, Green Earth Baby Works founder, Kim Leo, is expanding her business to offer linen and laundry service for local, environmentally conscious commercial enterprises.

Green Earth Laundry Works (GELW) grew when Green Earth Baby Works expanded through the addition of needed cleaning machines and staff to support the pilot program, which is now open for business. The program offers the same local environmentally conscious laundry service to businesses in the seacoast area and southern New Hampshire.

The Perfect Pair Opens Center for Practicing Ancient Energy Arts

Feb 3, 2015

Originally posted on Seacoast Online.

By Mark Quirk

PORTSMOUTH – When Bill Buckley and Tom Pray met it was nothing short of fate in every sense. The two, both owners of local businesses, found an instant connection in their backgrounds, beliefs and common core values of sustainability.

The timing was perfect, too.

Buckley wanted to train in karate, which Pray teaches, while Pray wanted to practice the Taiji and Qigong that Buckley is passionate about teaching. Now they both offer their services, as well as yoga, under one roof at Gateway Taiji, Qigong & Yoga studio on 875 Islington St. It’s a sort of one-stop shop for martial arts and meditative healing-based exercise.

“This is unique,” Pray said, who has been teaching Shotokan karate since 1987. “You don’t find that blend of teaching anywhere.”

Green Collar Careers: Green Maids Owner Johnmark O'Brien

Feb 2, 2015

Originally posted on Fosters and Fosters.com.

By Anna Murphy

Johnmark O’Brien, owner of Green Maids, has been cleaning up grime since 2009. O’Brien started his green cleaning company with the mission to keep harmful chemicals out of the community and local environment’s waste-stream. It was a mission O’Brien embarked upon while a college student.

Based in York Harbor, Maine, Green Maids now services the New Hampshire seacoast as well as southern Maine. All cleaning products used by Green Maids must either be Green Seal Certified or guaranteed to be all natural, biodegradable, earth friendly, non-toxic and safe for home and office use. The Green Maids cleaning team makes their rounds in a Toyota Prius hybrid.

Green Maids actively gives back to its community, conducting three to four beach cleanups each year. With sustainability at the forefront of each decision he makes, O’Brien says that every action taken, no matter how small, builds toward a greener future.

Meet a Green Alliance Business: RiverWoods

Feb 2, 2015

Originally published on Seacoast Online.

Who: RiverWoods

What: Located in Exeter, RiverWoods is not a stereotypical retirement community. Founded in 1994 by Seacoast residents, the nonprofit continuing care retirement community offers an impressive list of amenities, including independent, assisted living and skilled nursing, a wellness center, dining rooms at each of its three Exeter campuses, three pools and fitness centers, resident-run country stores and more.

Ahead of the curve in its industry, RiverWoods has a number of sustainability initiatives in place to make it one of the greenest retirement communities in the region. Upgrades to all three campuses include automated heating systems, LED and CFL lighting fixtures and a solar thermal system for heating water in kitchens. All three pools feature saline water instead of traditional chlorine.

RiverWoods also has its own group of sustainably minded environmental activists, known as the Sustainability Committee, who work to further green initiatives at all three campuses and in the surrounding community. The Sustainability Committee is working to increase recycling use throughout its three campuses and educates residents on the follies of using garbage disposals, advocating for individual composting instead.

Read the full story on Seacoast Online here.