News : September 2014

Experience A Different Side of Portsmouth on A Gundalow Company Sail

Sep 30, 2014

Published on Seacoast Online

By Kyle Bonus

PORTSMOUTH – In an area rich in history, it’s important to have opportunities to take a step back from the present and learn from the past. The Gundalow Company offers school children and the public a chance to use their vessel as a time machine to sail back in time and learn the importance these unique transports had on the region’s maritime industry.

In the 1650s gundalows, a shallow drafted type of cargo barge, were specifically designed for the region. Their unique flat-bottom design allowed for the vessel to rest on the muddy river-bottom when the tide went out, and evenly rise with the incoming tide. Gundalows made it possible for cargo to be shipped upstream from Portsmouth to towns such as Durham, Newmarket and Dover, expanding trade and developing Portsmouth into a successful port town. Because of their key role in developing the area’s economy, the gundalow is often referred to as the tractor-trailer of its time.

However, as new means of land transportation were developed, including the growth of the railroad, the gundalow became obsolete and nearly forgotten. In 2002 a group of individuals concerned with both the preservation of the gundalow’s history and the well-being of the seacoast’s waterways started The Gundalow Company, a non-profit, to share their concerns with the public.

Today the Gundalow Company offers various types of group sailing trips through Portsmouth and Kittery on their gundalow, the Piscataqua, designed to emulate the cargo barges of the past. The Gundalow Company is passionate about spreading awareness of the region’s maritime heritage and environment through education and action. With education at the forefront of the Gundalow Companies mission, many school and youth sails are offered for children of all ages from spring to fall.

Read the full story here.

Meet a Green Alliance Business: Great Works Chiropractic

Sep 29, 2014

Originally published in the Portsmouth Herald and Seacoast Online.

Who: Great Works Chiropractic

What: Eschewing traditional methods of symptom-driven medical diagnosis and treatment, Dr. Seth LaFlamme helps people by focusing on corrective, rather than palliative, care. Equating his methods to putting out a fire and clearing the smoke instead of removing an alarm's batteries, LaFlamme uses extensive neurological and structural measures to track a patient's progress throughout his or her treatment. He views this type of approach as inherently sustainable by honoring rather than silencing the body’s cries for help. With the recent expansion of his offices in South Berwick, Maine, LaFlamme, along with his wife and partner, Dr. Briana Duga, provides expanded adult and pediatric services for whole-family care.

Where: 249 Main St., South Berwick, Maine

Web: www.greatworkschiro.com

What Makes Them Green:

  • Provides results-driven corrective care without the use of environmentally hazardous pharmaceuticals.
  • Produces no bio-hazardous medical waste.
  • Brings “sustainability” down to individual level, emphasizing the crucial importance of long-term thinking versus crisis-driven health care and lifestyle decisions.

Read the full version on Seacoast Online here.

QA Cafe Teams with MetalWave, Green Alliance and More for eCycling Event in Portsmouth

Sep 26, 2014

Published on Seacoast Online and Portsmouth Patch

PORTSMOUTH – On Monday, September 29, QA Cafe will team with MetalWave, Inc., Green Alliance, Axis Business Solutions and Alpha Loft. The event will take place at 55 Green Street in Portsmouth, N.H. from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Located at QA Cafe’s offices, a recycling station will be set up in the parking lot and will be open to all Green Alliance consumer members as well as friends and family of Green Alliance Business Partners. All consumer members must have a valid Green Alliance Member card with them when they drop off their used electronics.

Items to recycle for free include: cell phones, computer mice, keyboards, speakers,toner, cables, wire, Laptops, PC’s, Servers, includes: Asset tag removal, Data erasure, U.S. Department of Defense Standards: 5220.22M and NIST SP 800-88. These devices will be recycled at no charge. Other items can be recycled for a drastically reduced fee and include CRT/LED MonitorsFlat Screen ($5 each), CRT ($10 for less than 25″; $20 for less than 25″), batteries ($2/lb.), fluorescent lamps ($0.05 each), printers, scanners, or copiers ($5 each), office phones ($1 each) and refrigerators, air conditioners, microwaves, etc. ($5-$25 each).

Read the full story on Seacoast Online or Portsmouth Patch.

If You Build An EV Station, They Will Come

Sep 26, 2014

Published in Business NH Magazine

According to 2013 figures from the Alternative Fuels Data Center by the U.S. Department of Energy, there are more than 20,600 public electric charging stations/outlets in the country. This is a dramatic leap from 2011 when there were around 2,000 such outlets.

The recent addition of a free EV Charging station at Redhook Brewery in Portsmouth is a sign of that evolution. Located at Pease International Tradeport, the Redhook Brewery charging station was facilitated by a $3,000 rebate from PSNH, the largest utility in New Hampshire. PSNH has also established four other charging stations that are free and open to the public. The other sites are at the Elm Street Parking Garage in Nashua and at Antioch University in Keene with two locations soon to be announced. The Redhook site will be the only one on the Seacoast.

Read the full story here.

Charting the Ocean

Sep 26, 2014

Published on Portsmouth Patch

The Ocean is a vast mystery. Marine naturalists Jen Kennedy and Dianna Schulte watched as the ocean – which makes up 70 percent of the Earth - was polluted and littered, overfished, and slowly degraded, until they could no longer sit back and consciously let the destruction continue. In 2001, they set out to raise awareness about local ocean life.

Kennedy and Schulte founded the Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation and made it their own personal missions to protect marine mammals in the Gulf of Maine. With the power of education they have slowly, but steadily, increased research and conservation efforts in the Gulf of Maine.

“We wanted to start the Blue Ocean Society so we could produce our own data, and have an outreach component, really try to get that data to the public in as close to real time as possible,” says Kennedy.

Read the full story on Portsmouth Patch.

Balance Your Body and Mind, Balance for Life

Sep 23, 2014

Published on Seacoast Online

PORTSMOUTH – At less than a year of age, children start to find their balance. Everything becomes a stabilizer; a tool to pull themselves up and see the world from a few inches higher. Soon after finding their balance, they’re off running. Throughout one’s life, all sorts of aspects can alter one’s balance—usually for the worst. When balance starts to get compromised, freedom can go with that, while fear of falling may increase. Gateway Taiji, Qigong & Yoga Studio recognizes that maintaining balance is essential for health and safety, and offers classes to restore balance.

Starting October 7, Gateway will be offering two Taiji for Better Balance classes.
Since introducing Taiji classes focusing on bettering balance in 2012, Gateway has helped a slew of participants find their equilibrium. The classes were started after the New Hampshire Fall’s Risk Reduction Task Force offered a specialized training session to Taiji students/masters, as a way to reduce the incredibly serious threat that falls pose to the elderly. The task force required that all participants go on to teach the class themselves.

Bill Buckley, owner of Gateway Taiji, Qigong & Yoga, took the class in 2011, and immediately started offering the classes. While the Task Force set out to protect the elderly, Gateway has broadened the spectrum to help all who wish to improve their balance. When asked what the average age of participants in the Taiji For Better Balances classes (new session starts October 7 at Taiji), Buckley was quick to point out it’s not a class specific to age but rather to those seeking to find their center again; and that in any given class he’s had a range in ages that spanned more than 40 years.

Read the full story here.

Net Zero Potential Becomes Reality in Rye

Sep 19, 2014

Published in Seacoast Online

RYE – “Green is good for all” is one of the practicing mantras at Futuro Builders. And in the case of a nearly-completed residential project in Rye, founder Jesse Ware and his company are truly practicing what they preach.

The net-zero home nearing completion in Rye Harbor may not be the first of its kind but Ware believes it will raise the bar for imaginative, cutting-edge sustainability design in the region.

Futuro Builders' net zero home build in Rye is projected to eliminate the homeowners energy bills.
When completed, the owners of this 2,400 square-foot home will not have a heating or electricity bill and are expected to actually generate energy credits. Due to a custom designed solar racking panel array, SIGA tapes to air seal the slab vapor barrier, and state-of-the-art Intus Windows that allow for superior insulation without sacrificing quality air ventilation, Ware said the home is an example of seamlessly merging smart sustainability and economics.

To read the full story click here

A Worthy Conversion with NH Company Leading the Charge

Sep 18, 2014

Published on Portsmouth Patch

NEWMARKET - What does the Mount Washington Auto Road have in common with a school transportation company in Brentwood? Both organizations are either planning to convert or have converted vehicles to run on Autogas, or propane fuel. It’s an energy efficient and cleaner-burning trend that is taking place all over the country, including right here at home in NH.

Proulx Oil and Propane in Newmarket is the driving force behind the slow but steady growth of Autogas in the region. Company president Jim Proulx has become an Autogas evangelist in part because he tested out a conversion on his personal vehicle and has converted almost 75 percent of his company’s service fleet. He believes “the numbers don’t lie” that Autogas makes sound business sense as a reliable alternative fuel.

“The market is still evolving and it’s my job to educate people and get the word out about the economic benefits of Autogas conversions,” said Proulx who recently spoke to the Raymond Rotary Club. “It has made financial sense for us to do it (conversions) to the point of replacing diesel vehicles before the end of their useful life with Autogas platforms to take advantage of the economic benefits as soon as possible.”

Garrett Scholes of Provider Bus Company in Brentwood, which provides transportation for special needs students for school districts throughout Southern New Hampshire, said Provider has begun a nine-vehicle pilot program after conversions earlier this year. The 14-passenger yellow buses will serve the Londonderry School District which approved the conversions as part of its contract with Provider.

Read the full story here.

Isles of Shoals Steamship Company Sponsors Gosport Regatta, Wraps Seasonal Walking Tours

Sep 16, 2014

Published on Seacoast Online and Portsmouth Patch

The Isles of Shoals Steamship Company is proud to offer cruises for spectators to view the GoSport Regatta on Saturday, September 20. The infamous M/V Thomas Leighton will be leaving from Portsmouth at 10:25 a.m. and will bring spectators to Star Island to witness this epic race. Spectators will also have the unique opportunity to stay overnight on Star Island, and return the following day on the Isles of Shoals’ final walking tour of Star Island this season.

The September 21 walking tour will include a special brunch accompanied by live jazz music and is open to those who opt to stay overnight on Star Island following the regatta, as well as anyone leaving from Portsmouth that morning. The cruise departs at 9:55 a.m. from Isles of Shoals Steamship Company’s headquarters on Market Street in Portsmouth. The expertly narrated walking tour dives into the history of the island, including the charting of the Isles in 1614 by Captain John Smith. 

To read the full story on Seacoast Online or Portsmouth Patch

Meet a Green Alliance Business

Sep 16, 2014

Published in Portsmouth Herald 

Who: Simply Green Biofuels

What: Since 2007, Simply Biofuels has grown to become one of the Seacoast's top, green-feuling companies, offering locally harnessed, 100 percent waste vegetable Bioheat as alternative to standard No. 2 home heating oil and petroleum diesel. Not only do the company's biofuels help reduce carbon dioxide emissions and other pollutants; they're also biodegradable and nontoxic. A typical household using Bioheat can reduce its carbon dioxide emissions by close to 15 percent and particulates pollution by 20 percent- emitting 3,200 pounds less carbon dioxide annually.

Where: 63 Atlantic Ave., North Hampton

Web: www.simplygreenbiofuels.com

Read the full story here.

Brewery to Unveil Charging Station

Sep 16, 2014

Published in Portsmouth Herald

Redhook Brewery, Public Service of New Hampshire and the Green Alliance will unveil the Seacoast's newest publicly available electric vehicle charging station at the brewery on Tuesday, Sept. 16. Redhook, in partnership with PSNH, installed the charging station, which is free to use, at the Pease Internatinal Tradeport brewery. Redhook also purchased renewable energy credits to offset the electricity used by the station as well as the rest of the facility. Tuesday's plug-in celebration, made possible with the help of the Green Alliance, will feature electric vehicles and an electric motorcycle as well as a check presentation to Redhook by PSNH

To see the full press release, pick up a copy of today's Herald.  

Proulx Fuels Change in Transportation

Sep 16, 2014

Published in Portsmouth Herald and on Seacoast Online

What does the Mount Washington Auto Road have in common with a school transportation company in Brentwood?

Both are either planning to convert or have converted vehicles to run on autogas, or propane fuel. It's an energy-efficient and cleaner-burning trend taking place all over the country, including in New Hampshire.

Proulx Oil and Propane in Newmarket is the driving force behind the slow but steady growth of autogas in the region. Company President Jim Proulx has become an autogas evangelist in part because he tested out a conversion on his personal vehicle and has converted almost 75 percent of his company's service fleet. He believes "the numbers don't lie" and that autogas makes sound business sense as a reliable alternative fuel.

"The market is still evolving and it's my job to educate people and get the word out about the economic benefits of autogas conversions," said Proulx, who recently spoke to the Raymond Rotary Club. "It has made financial sense for us to do it (conversions) to the point of replacing diesel vehicles before the end of their useful life with autogas platforms to take advantage of the economic benefits as soon as possible."

Garrett Scholes of Provider Bus Co. in Brentwood, which provides transportation for special needs students for school districts throughout southern New Hampshire, said Provider has begun a nine-vehicle pilot program after conversions earlier this year. The 14-passenger yellow buses will serve the Londonderry School District, which approved the conversions as part of its contract with Provider.

Scholes had a chance meeting with Proulx at an alternative fuel conference in Massachusetts in early 2013. Scholes began doing extensive research to determine if conversion was the right financial move for his company. He estimates Provider will save $1.50 to $2 a gallon for vehicles using autogas.

Read the full story on Seacost Online

Purely Organic Ahead of Lawn Care Curve

Sep 16, 2014

Published in Portsmouth Herald and on Seacoast Online

PORTSMOUTH — Purely Organic Lawn Care was started in 2003, when owner Jay Palladino made an unfortunate connection between his golden retriever getting sick and the newly applied fertilizer on the lawn at his Kensington home.

"I was an early investor in the organic fertilizer company Cockadoodle Doo but hadn't thought much about the chemicals on my lawn until my 6-week-old puppy passed out on the kitchen floor," Palladino said.While organic lawn care clicked as a business model, Palladino admits he was in unchartered territory. "I knew nothing about using organics and growing grass," he said.

Palladino said early challenges for his small company were due to a marketplace unprepared for Purely Organic's brand and not fully ready to embrace sustainability."We were ahead of our time," he said. "Most people preferred using chemicals and didn't give much thought to what it was doing to the water supply or the health of their family."

Consumer awareness about chemicals on lawns has changed dramatically in the past few years. Palladino said the shift has led to major growth in residential and commercial demand for safer and greener lawn care.

Read the full story at Seacost Online

 

Environmental Recycling Event Opens to Residents of 10 New Hampshire Communities

Sep 10, 2014

Published on Portsmouth Patch and Seacoast Online

Need to make room for the new iPhone 6? Each year there’s a new electronic device we’re itching to buy, whether its a smartphone, TV, tablet or computer, we’re inundated with messages telling us to upgrade. So what happens when we do upgrade? Where does an old iPhone or laptop end up? Some consumers wipe the memory from their devices and donate their old equipment to charities that refurbish the technology. But sadly, many people throw their electronics out with the household trash, which can lead to both environmental and personal data issues.

On September 13 from 9 a.m. to noon, MetalWave, Inc. will support a large-scale recycling event located at the Brentwood Highway Shed on Middle Rd (Rte 111A) neighboring the Pilgrim United Church of Christ. Items to bring include any end-of-life IT products, from laptops, servers and PCs, to keyboards, mice, printers, hand-held electronics such as smart-phones, tablets, PDAs and household items like telephones and televisions. The event is open to New Hampshire residents living within the Southeast Regional Refuse Disposal District including; Brentwood, Fremont, Hampton, Hampton Falls, Kensington, New Castle, North Hampton, Rye, Sandown and South Hampton. Due to the popularity of the event, residents from outside these areas might risk being turned away.

Located in Amesbury, Mass., MetalWave offers recycling services and Solid State Drive (SSD) Data Sanitation Solutions, leaving consumers of electronic equipment feeling safe and secure in knowing that their information, and waste, is not sitting in a landfill.

Read the full story on Portsmouth Patch or Seacoast Online

NH Company Helps Others A Make Worthy Conversion

Sep 10, 2014

Published in Business NH Magazine

By Michael Mccord

What does the Mount Washington Auto Road have in common with a school transportation company in Brentwood? Both organizations are either planning to convert or have converted vehicles to run on autogas, or propane fuel. It’s an energy efficient and cleaner-burning trend that is taking place all over the country, including right here at home in NH.

Proulx Oil and Propane in Newmarket is the driving force behind the slow but steady growth of autogas in the region. Company president Jim Proulx has become an autogas evangelist in part because he tested out a conversion on his personal vehicle and has converted almost 75 percent of his company’s service fleet. He believes “the numbers don’t lie” that autogas makes sound business sense as a reliable alternative fuel.

“The market is still evolving and it’s my job to educate people and get the word out about the economic benefits of Autogas conversions,” said Proulx who recently spoke to the Raymond Rotary Club. “It has made financial sense for us to do it (conversions) to the point of replacing diesel vehicles before the end of their useful life with autogas platforms to take advantage of the economic benefits as soon as possible.”

Garrett Scholes of Provider Bus Company in Brentwood, which provides transportation for special needs students for school districts throughout Southern New Hampshire, said Provider has begun a nine-vehicle pilot program after conversions earlier this year. The 14-passenger yellow buses will serve the Londonderry School District, which approved the conversions as part of its contract with Provider.

Read the full story on Business NH Magazine

Meet a Green Alliance Business: Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Northern New England

Sep 8, 2014

Published in the Portsmouth Herald.

Who: Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Northern New England

What: The Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Northern New England (CCNNE), a franchise of its parent company, is leading the way in sustainable practices for a large-scale manufacturing and distribution facility. Based in Londonderry, CCNNE works to reduce their carbon footprint in the creation and delivery of their products. The plant boasts a 93 percent recycling diversion rate and in 2013 sold over 12 million pounds of recycled commodities, working closely with Hampton, New Hampshire's Foss Manufacturing to process its recycled bottles and turn them into usable material. Its unique Energy Management Systems installed in the company's coolers and used in stores and restaurants, reduces clients' energy use by 35 percent. The company also invests in the community, such as sponsoring a full recycling station at the Special Olympics and spreading awareness about the impact recycling has both locally and globally.

Where: 1 Executive Park Drive, Suite 330 Bedford, N.H. 03110

Web: www.ccnne.com

Nonprofit Keeps Gundalow History Alive

Sep 5, 2014

Published in the Portsmouth Herald

By Michael McCord

In their heyday in the late 1700s and well into the 1800s, gundalows were ubiquitous in the Piscataqua River region as an indispensable part of the Seacoast's diverse economy.

For almost three centuries, these flat-bottomed cargo barges were a practical solution to transportation in the maritime regions of Maine and New Hampshire. They were the tractor-trailers and railroad freight cars of their day, as they efficiently worked the tides. As the gundalows evolved in style and function (adding sails, decks and even cabins), they became the transportation linchpin of commercial development as they often brought raw materials up river to cotton factories and brick yards, then returned with finished products.

Since its founding in 2002, the nonprofit Gundalow Co. in Portsmouth has provided thousands of school children and adults the opportunity to explore the history of the gundalow. In 2011, the Piscataqua was built at Strawbery Banke, following in the footsteps of the Capt. Edward H. Adams built there and launched in 1982. From May through October, the Piscataqua sails the tidal rivers as a floating classroom and passenger vessel, offering lessons that connect the history of yesterday to the environmental imperatives of today.

Mostly unheralded as a floating beast of burden, the last working gundalow was in service until 1920. Barbara Pinto Maurer, education director at the Gundalow Co., and a hearty crew of dedicated staff and supporters are working to keep the legacy alive. The Gundalow Company's mission is to protect the Piscataqua Region's maritime heritage and environment through education and action, and Pinto Maurer believes that mission has never been more critical.

Read the full story on SeacoastOnline

The Wasps Next Door

Sep 5, 2014

Published on Portsmouth Patch, Seacoast Online and Weekly Sentinel

By Craig Brown

ELIOT, Maine - Sometimes it starts with a low hum, something dull and distant droning like a lawnmower in the distance; someone in the neighborhood perhaps. Then, at a backyard cookout, a friend sipping on their lemonade can’t get away from one. That’s when you see it, a wasp’s nest the size of a volleyball hanging underneath the porch steps like a paper lantern. This summer Tom Pray, of Ecotech Pest Services in Eliot, Maine, saw a drastic spike in yellow jacket populations that, even with a B.S. in entomology, leaves him stumped as to why there are so many reported nests.

“Last year we had a bumper crop of bald face hornets and yellow jacket nests. We’re probably just seeing the result of that,” Pray hypothesized. “All those nest sites last year created new queens for this year, so a large number of them survived the winter and now they’re creating new nest sites during the summer.”

Pray was recently called to a property not by the homeowner, but by Minute Men Painters, a green painting company in Portsmouth, who couldn’t paint the home because three wasp nests were found along the roof line. To combat these pests, Pray has different pieces of equipment and treatments that allow him to remove these stinging insects wherever they may nest.

Read the full story on Portsmouth Patch or Seacoast Online or Weekly Sentinel

Green Olives: Two Ceres Street Cocktail Lounge Specializes in Sustainable Design

Sep 5, 2014

Published on SeacoastOnline

By Sam Ueda

PORTSMOUTH – It’s just before 8:00 p.m. on a Friday, and the decks of Poco’s Bow Street Cantina are quickly filling up. Inside, the soft glow of the sunset melts into the warm LED lamplight at Two Ceres Street, a cocktail lounge nestled inside Poco’s. Guests can sit in low chairs and gaze out at the waterfront, feeling the breeze blow in through the opened glass wall. During the winter months, Two Ceres Street is its own, separate entity, but between mid-May and September, the two establishments combine.

Two Ceres Street is transformative; it literally changes shape with the seasons. During the cold months, it’s a cozy hideout to snuggle up next to a martini in front of a roaring fireplace, complete with deep leather chairs and corner nooks. When late spring comes around, the glass doors open to a deck; the high-top martini tables and large leather couch are removed, and Two Ceres merges with Poco’s Bow Street Catina, giving its intimate lounge atmosphere some space to breathe.

“People don’t want to be inside on a beautiful summer day, so we made Two Ceres Street able to accommodate more of an outdoor atmosphere when it’s warm,” says Marlisa Geroulo, co-owner of Poco’s and Two Ceres Street. During the summer, guests at Two Ceres Street can enjoy the full Poco’s food and drink line-up, though its most popular martinis stay on the menu.

Read the whole story on SeacoastOnline

Pest service has busy season tackling wasps, yellow jackets

Sep 3, 2014

By Craig Robert Brown

Published on Fosters.com

ELIOT, Maine — Sometimes it starts with a low hum, something dull and distant droning like a lawnmower in the distance; someone in the neighborhood perhaps. Then, at a backyard cookout, a friend sipping on their lemonade can’t get away from one.

That’s when you see it, a wasp’s nest the size of a volleyball hanging underneath the porch steps like a paper lantern. This summer Tom Pray, of Ecotech Pest Services in Eliot, Maine, saw a drastic spike in yellow jacket populations that, even with a degree in entomology, leaves him stumped as to why there are so many reported nests.

“Last year we had a bumper crop of bald face hornets and yellow jacket nests. We’re probably just seeing the result of that,” Pray hypothesized. “All those nest sites last year created new queens for this year, so a large number of them survived the winter and now they’re creating new nest sites during the summer.”

Read the full story on Fosters.com