News : April 2013

Green Collar Careers: Seacoast Energy Alternatives Owner Jack Bingham

Apr 30, 2013

From The New Hampshire

By Austin Sorette

Since their inception in 2008, SEA Solar Store, based in Barrington, has solidified it's role as the flagship business of renewable home energy products and solar systems in Southern New Hampshire. Gaining much of his experience in his eclectic work history before turning to solar full time, owner Jack Bingham, soon to be 59, brings a broad range of affordable alternative energy choices to the table. SEA offers everything under the sun of environmentally pragmatic products; ultra-insulated hot water storage tanks; waterless, composting toilets; even a zero-emissions electric scooter that goes 30 miles on a single charge.

Unpublished
n/a

Green Tips: Zev Yoga

Apr 29, 2013

This week's Green Tips come from Zev Yoga. With locations in Portsmouth, Exeter and Dover. Zev offers an affordable, in-depth curriculum aimed at helping Seacoast residents find their own "inner sustainability."

1. Take probiotics. Probiotics are live bacteria that are beneficial for overall health, and are a great alternative to supposed "cure-all" chemicals and pills. Most health food stores carry them, so give them a try, and watch your health improve.

2. Speaking of natural health remedies, how about PREbiotics? PREbiotics are plant-based, fiber-filled foods that support the growth of good bacteria — raw onions, garlic, bananas, peas, asparagus, honey and burdock root, and the like. PREbiotics can also improve absorption of minerals, balance your pH, and improve heart health.

3. Give yoga a try. More and more people are eschewing expensive health clubs for the holistic benefits of yoga. At Zev Yoga, we help you cultivate an inner sustainability, while offering an affordable option that can help enable you to make your life even greener.

4. Bring your water bottle to the studio. Most studios will have complimentary water stations, but if you're visiting a studio in another city, don't get stuck buying bottled water.

5. Looking for a new yoga mat? Companies like Manduka (www.manduka.com) have a great selection of sustainably rendered options.

For information about Zev Yoga, Click Here!

Businessman follows passion to preserve photographs, rivers

Apr 29, 2013

From Foster's Daily Democrat and Portsmouth Patch

By Herb Perry

GREENLAND — RiverWorks Printing specializes in commercial advertising for clients both local and national, forging a unique, green niche in providing its many clients with myriad sustainability-driven printing alternatives.

In so doing, it is helping reshape the green conversation within its industry.

But before there was RiverWorks, there was Wall Shotz — now a division of the former — launched by RiverWorks owner Jeff Cutter as a way to render his and others’ photography into frame-able works of art.

To read the full story on Fosters, click here! To read it on Portsmouth Patch, click here

 

Shapleigh School kids 'change the world' with composting

Apr 25, 2013

From The Portsmouth Herald

By Suzanne Laurent

KITTERY, Maine — About 20 members of Shapleigh School’s Green Team eagerly awaited a very special delivery Tuesday morning.

When a pickup truck running on biodiesel showed up at the school with two yards worth of soil, they could barely contain their excitement. This was not any dirt. It was the fruit of their labor after policing the school’s cafeteria since September to make sure trash was recycled or put into the compost bin.

Each week since September, Rian Bedard of EcoMovement picked up 200 to 300 pounds of compost material from the school, and now it is dark, rich soil for students to use in their new greenhouse.

“It’s great for the environment,” said fourth-grader Brennan Desmond, adding he tries to eat more salads that are made with organic ingredients.

“It’s amazing to think that little kids can change the world,” added fourth-grader Antonia Eaton.

For the full story click here!

Tree companies helping Fort foster for Arbor Day

Apr 25, 2013

From Foster's Daily Democrat

By Heikki Perry

KITTERY, Maine — Friday April 26th is Arbor Day,and what better reason for local tree companies to honor Arbor Day than through volunteering to take care of the city’s green giants?

The Seacoast Arborist Collaborative, a four-company group that includes Cornerstone Tree Care and Piscataqua Tree Care, celebrates Arbor Day by donating services — which it has done for the last five years — to help care for trees in a public park. This year’s event will start at 8:30 a.m. at Fort Foster, in Kittery Point. Upwards of eight internationally certified arborists from the four companies will be present and available for questions throughout the park for the day.

Everyone is invited to this event to watch the work unfold and learn something about the newest techniques and information in the field of arboriculture and the diverse trees that scatter our coastal landscape.

For the full story, click here!

Free classes offered in Portsmouth for World Tai Chi and Qigong Day

Apr 24, 2013

From The Portsmouth Herald

In honor of World Tai Chi and Qigong Day, Gateway Taiji will be hosting demonstrations and free classes to help spread awareness and understanding of the Tai Chi (also spelled "taiji"). Demonstrations by both Bill Buckley and Kevin Beane at Gateway Taiji in Portsmouth, will take place from 1 p.m.-3 p.m. on Saturday, April 27. Buckley, founder of Gateway Taiji, will be demonstrating the Qigong as a form of low impact exercise and energy cultivation from 1-2 p.m., and Beane will be hosting a class on the fundamental awareness of the principles of Tai Chi from 2-3 p.m.

World Tai Chi and Qigong Day is celebrated by thousands of people across the globe. Tai Chi (also spelled "taiji") and Qigong (chi kung) promote an Eastern approach to healthy exercise, meditation, and mindfulness practices. The GateWay events are part of a larger Seacoast celebration of World Tai Chi and Qigong Day.

For the full story, click here!

Healing Hands Supports Local Business, Offers Mother’s Day Deals

Apr 24, 2013

From The Exeter Patch

By Jim Cavan

We all have a pretty good idea of what “think local” means for individual consumers. Eschewing big box stores for family owned storefronts, buying products made in town, state or country – the low hanging fruit, so to speak.

In the world of small business – where stress runs high and the margins can be razor thin – the blueprint might not seem so obvious. Which is what makes the model put forth by the husband and wife team of Dr. Jessica and Brian Caruso so inspiring.

The Carusos, who own and operate Healing Hands Community Chiropractic, have managed to grow their downtown Portsmouth office with a mix of old fashioned hard work, community outreach, and – increasingly – innovative partnerships with other area business owners.

To read the full story, click here!

Tree Companies to Go Out on a Limb for Arbor Day

Apr 24, 2013

From The Portsmouth Patch

By Heikki Perry

KITTERY, Maine — Friday is Arbor Day, and what better reason for local tree companies to honor Arbor Day than through volunteering to take care of the city’s green giants?

The Seacoast Arborist Collaborative, a four-company group that includes Cornerstone Tree Care and Piscataqua Tree Care, celebrates Arbor Day by donating services— which it has done for the last five years — to help care for trees in a public park. This year’s event will start at 8:30 a.m. at Fort Foster, in Kittery Point. Upwards of eight internationally certified arborists from the four companies will be present and available for questions throughout the park for the day.

Everyone is invited to this event to watch the work unfold and learn something about the newest techniques and information in the field of arboriculture and the diverse trees that scatter our coastal landscape.

For the full story in The Portsmouth Patch, click here!

Minute Men Painters Goal: Exceed Customers’ Expectations

Apr 24, 2013

From The Portsmouth Patch

By Heikki Perry

PORTSMOUTH — “If you are doing your job right, the customers will spread the word.”

So says Sean Sturk, co-owner with Chris Tufts of Minute Men Painters, both men dedicated to providing the highest quality professional services, a business model they have relentlessly pursued not only because quality work is a value in and of itself, but also because happy customers spread the word, a necessity in what has been a down economy.

Minute Men Painters is a licensed and insured residential and commercial painting company committed to providing reliable and professional services to every improvement project. It also has taken substantial steps to fully offer sustainable goods or services, specializes in using approved green paints and non-toxic, environ-friendly products. And it is practicing an impressive number of green business techniques.

To read the full story in the Patch, click here!

Sagamore Offers Community Family-Friendly Golf on Eco-Friendly Greens

Apr 24, 2013

From Foster's Daily Democrat

By Heikki Perry

Traditionally the province of private country clubs, golf has seemed inaccessible to the uninitiated, an activity only people with money can afford to play.  But a Seacoast community golf course -- with emphasis on the word "community" -- belies the notion that golf is exclusive, offering instead a family-friendly activity that is affordable and fun.

And beyond allowing anyone to participate in what was once an exclusive sport, this venue stands at the vanguard of a green revolution, initiating several sustainable practices that other courses now emulate.

Sagamore-Hampton Golf Club, 101 North Road, North Hampton, NH, and Sagamore Golf Center, the golf course's companion driving range, 22 North Road, North Hampton, focus on accessibility.  You don't have to be a member to play.  In fact, Sagamore doesn't have memberships. It's strictly a daily-fee golf course.

This story is not posted online, so to read the full story in the Earth Day insert in April 21st's Foster's, pick one up at your local newsstand!

UNH Dairy Bar Offers Cream of Sustainability's Crop

Apr 24, 2013

From Foster's Daily Democrat

By Heikki Perry

DURHAM, NH -- "Sustainability is one of the UNH's core values," says Andrew Porter, the university's retail manager of dining services.  And diners are the beneficiaries of an embodiment of those values, a university sustainability program that grows fresh greens locally for consumption at the UNH Dairy Bar.

UNH is practicing sustainability in a substantive and beneficial way, taking advantage of its status as a land grant institution with a cooperative extension program to grow vegetables on its campus farm, supplying the UNH Dairy Bar with fresh, tastier greens, recycling 90 persent of Dairy Bar's food waste, while also teaching students about horticulture in a hands-on way.  

Located at the Durham train station, the Dairy Bar has always been an asset for the Durham community, and now it's taking its efforts to the next level, along the way showcasing its ability to be sustainable in an ever-growing variety of ways.

This story is not posted online, so to read the full story in the Earth Day insert in April 21st's Foster's, pick one up at your local newsstand!

Newmarket Dental Uses Green As Leverage For Growth

Apr 24, 2013

From Foster's Daily Democrat

By Jim Cavan

I'd only been sitting in the patient's chair for five or ten minutes -- an eye's blink in the world of dentistry.  Right as I found myself getting lost in the serene wall-mounted Tuscan panaorama directly facing me, Dr. Nathan Swanson, owner of Newmarket Dental, entered the room.

"Thanks for seeing me on such short notice, Nathan," I said, just two days after hurriedly booking my appointment with Pauline, the office receptionist.

"Thank Pauline," replied Swanson. "I just show up -- she fills the chairs."

If you'd never met Swanson means, however, one need look no further than the office appointment book, where digital ink fills hour blocks for weeks on end.  It's been this way for a while now -- the steady stream of patients, endless referrals, and non-stop bouts beneath the overhead lamps.

This story is not posted online, so to read the full story in the Earth Day insert in April 21st's Foster's, pick one up at your local newsstand!

Green Collar Careers: Yankee Thermal Imaging Founder and Principal Chris Meyer

Apr 23, 2013

From The New Hampshire

By Austin Sorette

From the start, Chris Meyer, 40, was aware of how influential rising oil prices were going to be on the housing and commercial real-estate markets. By the mid 2000s, he decided to start educating himself on how to make their properties more efficient. The result of years of research led to the inception of Yankee Thermal Imaging in 2008, with the goal of providing the most advanced, reliable and cost-effective residential and commercial energy audits.

Ancient Traditions Founder Takes Naturopathic Path Back To Seacoast

Apr 22, 2013

From Foster's Daily Democrat

By Jim Cavan

Career callings can come in any number of incarnations, from conscious networking to chance encounters, family recommendations to fiscally fruitful passion projects. Sometimes, however, the prompt can be much more intense -- frightening, even.

In a journey that has taken her from the Seacoast to the Pacific Northwest and back again, Dr. Angela Lambert's career path fell squarely in the latter camp.

Growing up, Lambert, owner of Ancient Traditions Natural Medicine in Portsmouth, displayed an immutable passion and talent for music, learning piano by the age of four, the oboe shortly thereafter, and eventually teaching herself flute and tenor sax.  When her dad needed a drummer to help hold the beat for his jazz band, Lambert learned that, too.

This story is not posted online, so to read the full story in the Earth Day insert in April 21st's Foster's, pick one up at your local newsstand!

Volatile Oil Markets Draw Attention Back to Geothermal

Apr 22, 2013

From Foster's Daily Democrat

By Jim Cavan

Middle East tensions might be far too complex for the average citizen to fully comprehend.  But anyone who's had to fill up at the pump or have his or her home oul tank topped off over the past few years understands at least one consequence of the turmoil.

According to the Office of Energy and Planning, New Hampshire currently spends $2.6 billion every year importing petrolium products.  What's more, over half of New Hampshire homes require conventional oil for heat.  

Some would argue that Granite Staters -- and New Englanders writ large -- have little choice but to ride out the markets and hope for cheaper fuel in the future.

This story is not posted online, so to read the full story in the Earth Day insert in April 21st's Foster's, pick one up at your local newsstand!

EZ Bikes and Scooters Offers Seacoast Bikers More Options

Apr 22, 2013

From Foster's Daily Democrat

By Jim Cavan

What is it about a place that makes Winter's thaw complete, bicyclists the region over are beginning to untangle bike chains, grease neglected gears, and unfurl their ride day best.  It won't be long before the Seacoast's myriad trails -- be them hugged by coastline roadways or granite craggy forest beds -- pop with fresh tracks beckoning the next in line.

For decades, Americans looking for more room and less congestion were wont to hitch wagon's west, out of Eastern hubs like Metro Boston and New York and into the vast, distant suburban sprawl.  In so doing, certain sacrifices were inevitably made, not the least of which was tight-knit towns and speedy commutes for space, space, and more space -- and more time behind the wheel.

But the East Coast's recent population comeback, reinforced in part by a vibrant re-purposing of once-abandoned hubs (think mill buildings), has had another, ancillary effect: a slew of easily accessible town and country biking options for its increasingly outdoors-centric residents.

This story is not posted online, so to read the full story in the Earth Day insert in April 21st's Foster's, pick one up at your local newsstand!

Green Alliance Hits the Century Mark

Apr 22, 2013

From Foster's Daily Democrat

By Jim Cavan

It might be another 96 years before the Green Alliance officially turns 100, but that's not stopping them from celebrating another kind of century mark.

Last week, the Portsmouth-based "green business union" officially welcomed aboard Home Town Technology Consultants (HTTC), making them the 100th "Business partner" in four years to take the green plunge.

An impressive feat, to be sure -- one made all the more admirable by the economic circumstances surrounding the company since the very beginning.

Launched in 2008 by environmental activist and journalist Sarah Brown, the GA's initial aims were simple: To connect green-minded consumers with local businesses committed to rendering their products, services, and operations more sustainable and through PR, brand building, and story-telling to help grow those same green businesses.

This story is not posted online, so to read the full story in the Earth Day insert in April 21st's Foster's, pick one up at your local newsstand!

Local green economy on the rise in spite of economic challenges

Apr 22, 2013

From Foster's Daily Democrat

By Tricia Dinkel

What is it about a place that makes you proud to call it home? For most, local pride is rarely found in chain restaurants, franchised merchants or corporate superstores, but rather instilled by the characteristically charming businesses and landmarks that reflect the locale in its own right.

Even before the 2008-marked start of the national recession, economic hardship persisted for local businesses in competition with larger companies that prioritized profit above all other business strategies, including the ethical and sustainable approaches that many small, local businesses were founded upon. It seems obvious to point out the imbalance with pitting corporations that maximize profit by any means necessary against those that practice environmental responsibility and social integrity every step of the way. Yet without change, "business as usual" continues to favor power and profit at the loss of stable local economies.

To read the full story, please pick up your copy of Fosters at your local news stand!

Green Collar Careers: Revolution Energy Founder Clay Mitchell

Apr 22, 2013

From The New Hampshire

By Austin Sorette

An Arizona native and lawyer by training, Clay Mitchell, 44, launched Revolution Energy in 2008 aspirating to change how large-scale alternative energy products are managed. As a result, Revolution offers innovative financial packages that help reduce the up-front investment costs of alternative energy systems.

The financing model, at least on its face, gave its competitors an infectious case of “why didn't I think of that?” Instead of being hassled with having to shell out 100 percent of the cost for a state-of-the-art solar array up front, now businesses and other entities can “go green” and only have to worry about paying the monthly bill. The whole arrangement – called a Power-Purchase Agreement – makes what was once a Holy Grail status of luxury, for only the most economically blessed clients, accessible to anyone.

Earth Day green tips from Green Alliance

Apr 22, 2013

From the Portsmouth Herald

This week's Earth Day Green Tips come from the Green Alliance.

Today is Earth Day, but we believe every day of the year should celebrate our green planet. Don't limit your support and nurturing of the planet to one day a year; check out these five easy tips for making every day Earth Day.

1. Plant a tree. For just $1, you can join the more than 13 million people who have already taken this fundamental earth-healing step. Go to www.plantabillion.org to learn more.

2. Attend a beach cleanup. The Surfrider Foundation's New Hampshire chapter hosts regular beach cleanups throughout the year, with the next one slated for May 25. Check out the organization's Web site, www.newhampshire.surfrider.org, for more dates.

3. Stop junk mail. Take control of the mail that floods your mailbox and cut down on paper use in the process. Sites like www.catalogchoice.org can help point you in the right direction to start eliminating unwanted junk mail.

To read the full article in the Portsmouth Herald, please click here!

'Black mark' scars Chechnya

Apr 22, 2013

From Seacoast Online

By Joey Cresta

KITTERY, Maine — Sarah Brown said she worries the connection of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects to Chechnya will negatively shape Americans' feelings about the Russian republic.

Brown, a Portsmouth, N.H., native and founder of the Green Alliance who now lives in Kittery, said she lived in Russia as a young journalist fresh out of Columbia University with a degree in Russian studies in the early 1990s. During her time there, she covered and visited Chechnya during the two wars over the republic's independence from Russia, working with the Associated Press and NBC.

Despite the inherent danger of visiting a region embroiled in war — Brown said a couple of her friends who were journalists died there — she recalled the Chechen people as hospitable, kind and generous.

"I have these incredible memories of these amazing Chechen people," she said. "It's horrible to see this black mark. Now, this is what every American is going to associate with this country. ... When they think of Chechnya, they're going to think of the Boston Marathon bombing."

To read the full story in Seacoast Online, please click here!

Green Alliance continues to make gains

Apr 22, 2013

From Portsmouth Herald

PORTSMOUTH — In the 43 years since its inception, Earth Day's cultural cache has blossomed enough — and inspired enough people — to yield a kind of tangential moral imperative: Every day should be earth day.

There are few organizations on the Seacoast where this mantra has taken deeper root than the Green Alliance.

Headquartered in downtown Portsmouth's historic Franklin Block building, the GA touts itself as many things — "green business union," "guerrilla public relations firm," "local green clearinghouse." At its core, however, the organization represents a critical nexus point in the Seacoast's growing green consciousness.

"If 10 different people ask what we do, you might hear 10 different answers, but we see that as a positive," said Sarah Brown, founder and director of the Green Alliance. "We wear a lot of different hats, but what we're especially passionate about is connecting green-minded consumers with the businesses that are truly doing their part to minimize their environmental impact."

To read the full story in the Portsmouth Herald, please click here

Be Good Branding Eschews Insincere Marketing for ‘Meaningful Brand Tactics’

Apr 17, 2013

From the Portsmouth Patch

By Heikki Perry

PORTSMOUTH — “One of my goals is to change the perception of marketing in the eyes of business owners from a means to make a profit to a means to make a difference,” says Bridget Sprague, proprietor of Be Good Branding. “And I think if you can make a difference in people’s lives with your business, then the money will come.”

Through Be Good Branding, Sprague works with socially responsible entrepreneurs and small-business owners, helping them develop a “brand strategy” to grow their business. What’s a brand strategy? “It defines a business’s core target audience and determines the messages that will resonate most with that audience,” says Sprague. “Small businesses don’t have large marketing budgets. They need to focus their energy on the people who are not only going to buy from them, but also will tell others about them.”

To get a business’s message out to its audience, Sprague helps it to develop “brand tactics.” Traditionally, advertising agencies would employ marketing tactics such as placing ads in magazines and on radio, and sending direct mail. “I stay away from traditional marketing for the most part, and try to recommend meaningful tactics that will build relationships versus just pushing out the message about what you do.”

To read the full story in the Patch, click here!

Green Tips: Site Structures Landscape

Apr 15, 2013

From Seacoast Online

This week's Green Tips come from Site Structures Landscape of Kittery, Maine, a landscaping and hardscaping company specializing in green techniques, materials and approaches.

1. Invest in some mulch. Not only does it help reduce water evaporation; it can also prevent weeds from taking over your yard. As mulch decomposes, it can improve the soil's structure.

2. When choosing plants, think native. There are hundreds of beautiful natives perfect for your landscape. Our local wildlife appreciate its fruit and flowers, and you will appreciate its hardiness. Avoid non-native invasives.

3. Raise your mower's deck to help combat weeds. This might sound counterintuitive, but taller grass reduces weeds and encourages deeper roots, thus improving drought tolerance and overall health. Never remove more than a third of the blade at a time if you can help it, and leave the clippings — they act as a slow-release natural fertilizer. The healthier your lawn , the less weed problems.

To read the full article in Seacoast Online, Click Here!

Green Collar Careers: Jim Pender Jr., president and COO of Rockingham Electric

Apr 15, 2013

From The New Hampshire

By Austin Sorrette

Today, Rockingham Electric is one of the most iconic businesses anywhere on the Seacoast – everyone knows the “big red barn” right off of Route 16. Founded in 1951, the company’s steady growth and ever-increasing popularity were dealt a huge blow in December 1968 when a fire broke out at its Portsmouth headquarters. Within hours the building – along with the inventory, company records, cash and accounts – were gone.

Former President Jim Pender, who also happens to be the father of the current president, 49-year-old Jim Pender, Jr., decided to move the company to Newington, right next to the General Sullivan Bridge, where the company continues to thrive today.

While the recession has dealt a blow to the building and construction trades, Rockingham has remained successful in part due to its optimistic embrace of efficient lighting products and design strategies, getting out in front of the forthcoming efficiency benchmarks with great enthusiasm.

“There’s somewhat of a learning curve when looking into incorporating LED lighting in particular, but there’s definitely a growing interest,” said Jim Pender, Jr., of the company’s green technology. “More and more we’re finding that people who are interested in really upgrading their home and doing it in a way that’s meaningful and more environmentally conscious, are figuring out that this is very viable choice.”

For the full story in TNH, click here.

Chiropractors to Celebrate Office Expansion

Apr 12, 2013

From The Weekly Sentinel

By Herb Perry

South Berwick -- Great Works Chiropractic and Wellness will hold a grand opening celebration for its new office expansion space at 249 Main St. in South Berwick.

The event will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. on Saturday, April 13.

Great Works is planning hula hooping demonstrations and classes, a yoga demonstration, a baby-wearing demo, a salon demo, balloon animals and kids' tattoos.

Great Works is converting its old space, 235 Main St., into offices and a meeting space. The 249 Main address will be the home of the day-to-day operations of the practice.

To read the full article, please pick up your own copy of The Weekly Sentinel!

Green Tips from Green Cocoon

Apr 12, 2013

From Portsmouth Herald

This week's Green Tips come from Green Cocoon, a Salisbury, Mass., company specializing in super efficient insulation options.

1. Install a programmable thermostat. For every 2 degrees Fahrenheit you lower your thermostat, you save 2 percent of heat energy used. Reducing the room temperature in the evening and when the building is vacant can have a large impact on your heating costs.

2. As the weather gets warmer, save on cooling costs by keeping the windows closed as long as possible.

It might sound counterintuitive, but doing so can actually keep your house cooler longer.

To read the full story in the Portsmouth Herald, click here!

Green Cocoon is a business partner of the Green Alliance. To learn more, click here!

Portsmouth Firm Makes High School Greener

Apr 8, 2013

From Exeter Patch

By Jim Cavan

If there was a criticism of the typical high school class, it might be that the learning experience is too often confined to the classroom.

But a recent initiative at Portsmouth High School (PHS) is aiming to change that.

Two years ago, a pair of members of the PHS science department – Dee Barrett and Kim McGlinchey – reached out to Peter Britz, the city’s chief Environmental Planner, about the possibilities for installing a rain garden.

Together, the three secured a grant from the Piscataqua Regional Estuary Partnership (PREP), a subsidiary of the University of New Hampshire. Britz was then able to procure matching funds from the city, which was used for excavation and grading of the garden.

Funding marshaled, the team reached out to Altus Engineering, a Portsmouth civil engineering with a robust background in municipal projects. While Altus’s range of undertakings is broadly impressive – and includes over 40 schools throughout the region – the company has always adhered to a constant pillar: making the project as eco-friendly as possible.

“Lessening environmental impacts has always been a chief tenant of ours,” said Eric Weinrieb, President of Altus. “With the PHS project, part of its purpose was to be an environmental teaching tool.”

Located adjacent to the football field, Portsmouth High School’s proposed rain garden –formally completed in the summer of 2011 – fits that ethos to a T. Boasting a host of plants native to the granite state, and shaped with the help of Terra Firma Landscaping, another Portsmouth-based company, the garden was and remains a beacon to local collaboration...

To read the full story in the Exeter Patch, Click Here!

Ecotech Offers Green Solution to Ant Management

Apr 8, 2013

From Portsmouth Patch, Green Energy Times, Fosters Daily Democrat, and Exeter Patch

By Jim Cavan

Chances are we’ve all had the experience: It’s the first truly warm day of the year – early April, let’s say – and you’ve just gotten back from an unseasonably balmy walk in the woods. You come through the front door, take off your shoes, head to the kitchen to start preparing the night’s dinner, and happen from the corner of your eye upon a trail of slowly moving black specks on the counter.

Carpenter ants. Dozens of them – and that’s just in plain view. Here in New England, ant infestation constitutes one of the most common pest problems, affecting some tens of thousands of households in New Hampshire alone and causing millions of dollars of damage nationwide.

Enter Tom Pray, founder of the Eliot-based Ecotech Pest Control and a degreed entomologist with over 25 years of experience in the field. Settling on the trade as much for the science as sheer insect fascination, Pray launched Ecotech in 2000 with the aim of helping homeowner’s beat back pest problems not through hard-hitting chemicals, but rather by managing the environment responsible for fostering that very infestation.

“People much prefer actual, scientifically-backed information over a sales pitch – it just makes them feel more comfortable with you as a business,” says Pray. “My customers say that it’s because of that information that they’re empowered to do more themselves to help the program I lay out with them. It’s why we succeed.”

Carpenter ants in particular offer a bounty of educational fodder, owing in part to the specie’s uniquely intricate breeding habits. It also doesn’t hurt that, according to Pray, they remain by far the most reported pest problem in the Seacoast region...

To read the full story in the Portsmouth Patch, Click Here! To Read on Green energy times, click here. To read on Fosters Daily Democrat, click here. 

To read the full story in the Exeter Patch, Click Here!

Local Businesses, Community Celebrate Earth Day By Giving Back To Seacoast

Apr 8, 2013

 From Exeter Patch

By Austin Sorette

For many, Earth Day is every day. But while Earth Day has long been recognized as a national holiday, the Seacoast Science Center is making sure that people remember why it is so important with a week-long celebration.

It all kicks off with a free Earth Day celebration on April 20, which is slated to include a 5K trail race, live music and recycled crafts.

But the main event might as well be the Earth Day beach clean-up. Spearheaded by businesses including Visions Kitchens and Design, Green Maids and the Bean Group's Hillary Gaynor, the clean-up offers Seacoast residents the perfect opportunity to show Mother Nature a little TLC.

“We're constantly doing beach clean-ups all year round,” said Nathan Johnson, Vice President and Senior Designer for Visions Kitchens and Design. “But when we found out that Seacoast Science Center was having an Earth Day Celebration, we wanted to start an Earth Day beach cleanup that was more noticeable and fun.”

Green Alliance believes wind energy is good for all

Apr 8, 2013

From Seacoast Online

By Becky Holt

April 5 — To the Editor:

In most cases, properly cited wind projects are a win-win for the clean energy movement and for local towns. We at the Green Alliance love to see folks actively engaging in a dialogue about renewable energy. When it comes to wind power, we need to be wary of what is fact and what is fiction because saying "no" to large-scale solutions to climate change will have a negative impact on not only ourselves but on future generations. A letter by Ray Cunningham ("We have a right to protect our N.H.," March 29), makes a variety of inaccurate claims about wind power.

First, New Hampshire is not required by a federal mandate to purchase wind power. Rather, our nation's energy policy is a patchwork of many different state-based renewable standards combined with federal tax incentives. Massachusetts' and New Hampshire's energy policy choices are largely determined by their state legislatures and implemented by their state public utility commissions. Every New England state has enacted a strong policy in favor of advancing new renewable energy sources.

To read the full article on Seacoast Online, please click here!

Dr. Delaplane treats allergies naturally at Starry Brook

Apr 8, 2013

From Fosters Daily Democrat

By Tricia Dinkel

EXETER -- Spring is known as the season of new beginnings. For those children that suffer from chronic allergies, the turning of the seasons is tough to endure when burdened with allergy-related symptoms.

Dr. Krista Delaplane joined the practice of Dr. Robyn Giard at Starry Brook Natural Medicine in January. As a naturopathic doctor and pediatric specialist, Delaplane’s services are very much needed to treat the growing number of children seeking relief from seasonal allergies. She embraces the fresh start of spring by offering her young patients allergy treatments using natural medicines.

Unlike seasonal allergy flare ups, food allergies can cause problems year round. The Centers for Disease Control reports an 18% increase in food allergies over the past decade. The increase echoes a global trend.

For the full story in Fosters, click here!

Renewable Energy Entrepreneur Talks Benefits, Challenges Of Going Green In N.H.

Apr 8, 2013

From NPR State Impact

By Amanda Loder

This week, StateImpact will be checking-in on the progress of the University of New Hampshire‘s Green Launching Pad initiative. Begun in 2010 with $1.5 million in federal stimulus money, the GLP’s goal is to provide seed money, UNH faculty business expertise, and student interns to entrepreneurs in the state’s growing green sectors.

One of the Green Launching Pad’s biggest success stories has been Portsmouth-based Revolution Energy. While the company started in 2008, it didn’t really start taking off until 2010. That’s when it received a competitive $60,000 grant from the GLP in the initiative’s first round of funding. In a lot of ways, Revolution Energy looks and feels a lot like a classic start-up. At the office, the team wears casual clothes, and the decor alternates between Dungeons and Dragons classic geek-chic and internet-age irony.

Good humor, hoodies and 20-sided dice aside, sustainability is serious business for the crew at Revolution Energy.We caught up with 29 year-old co-founder Mike Behrmann and asked him about the role of the Green Launching Pad in his company’s success, and the challenges and rewards of launching a green start-up in the Granite State.

To read the full article, please click here!

Green Business Initiative Sees Rewards, But Faces Challenges

Apr 8, 2013

From NHPR

By Amanda Loder

A taxpayer-funded eco-business program is paying off for New Hampshire. The Green Launching Pad at the University of New Hampshire has given grants to more than a dozen start-ups in the state. But it hasn’t awarded any new funds since last year.

But the scene at the statehouse last winter was one of optimism for a cadre of entrepreneurs and their supporters. The Green Launching Pad was awarding its companies federal money. Over the course of two years, the program got $1.5 million in stimulus funding to give out to the most promising green start-ups in the state. Then-Governor John Lynch was optimistic about the program’s future even as the federal funds were drying up.

“I think we all recognize the real value of these Green Launching Pad companies, and the partnerships with the University of New Hampshire. Because they will create manufacturing jobs in an important area for our state," Lynch said. "So because of the recognition of the importance of this, I do think the funding will be available to continue the Green Launching Pad.”

To read the full story, click here!

Solar panels coming soon to Eliot DPW

Apr 5, 2013

From Portsmouth Herald

By Roger Wood

ELIOT, Maine — In the next several weeks, 160 electricity-producing solar panels should be arriving at the town's Department of Public Works garage off Route 236.

When installed on the roof of the building, the panels should produce some 42,000 kilowatts of power during sunny days.

The town's Energy Committee said the panels, manufactured by Maine-based ReVision Energy, will be installed free of charge on the reinforced roof, and maintained by the company for six years. In return, the town will pay ReVision 2 cents per kilowatt hour below Central Maine Power Company's rate, approved by the Public Utilities Commission. Under the approved plan, the company will lease the roof for $1 a year.

To read the full article in the Portsmouth Herald, click here!

'Recycling Trifecta' Makes Environment a Winner

Apr 5, 2013

Published in Granite State Sentinel and Portsmouth Patch

By Heikki Perry

PORTSMOUTH- Redhook Brewery is known for its sustainability practices, partnering with EcoMovement Consulting and Hauling of Dover, for example, on a top-to-bottom composting program, picking up Redhook's food scraps and taking it to compost farms, where the refuse is mixed with carbon sources and made into nutrient-rich soil.

But it took a visit from representatives of a recycling company, Poly Recovery, to prompt the brewery to take a second look at the tons of plastic Redhook was throwing out, resulting in Redhook's sustainability program ascending to an even higher level…

To read the full story, grab yourself a hard copy of The Granite State Sentinel. Or check out the Portsmouth Patch.
 

Green Collar Careers: Lynnfield Green Technologies

Apr 4, 2013

From The New Hampshire

By Austin Sorette

It’s not often that a one-time journalist and a former computer security executive join forces to create a cutting-edge green product. But that’s precisely what happened when Patrick Lucci and Gerard Kiley worked together to create Lynnfield Green Technologies, developing a multitude of cleaning and sanitizing products that not only work better, but are affordable and earth-friendly, as well. --The flagship product of the Massachusetts-based business is the Toucan-ECO, an “electrolyzer” that produces a harmless yet effective cleaning and sanitizing solution created from table salt, tap water and a small charge of electricity.

Requiring no more than a few minutes of activation time and 1.5 liters of water, the product creates a sanitizer that is more effective at 50 parts per million than chlorine bleach is at 200 parts per million, yet remains harmless to humans and pets. The electrolyzer also produces a sodium hydroxide compound that can reduce or, in some cases, eliminate the need for soaps and detergents in a variety of housekeeping applications. It is acidic and alkaline electrolyzed water. It is effective, safe and easy to generate, and it costs a half-cent per gallon on site.
Not bad for a double career audible. Indeed, if Lucci and Kiley have proven anything, it’s that it is never too late for a second career – particularly one so positively green. Lucci took the time to answer some questions about his career at Lynnfield Green Technologies last week.

AS: What do you like most about your job?

PL: My job is exciting because we are pioneering a technology that is creating a paradigm shift in cleaning and sanitizing. If it was 25 years ago and political correctness was not the rule of the day, we would still see the dreaded skull and cross bones on just about everything that we use to clean and sanitize our homes and offices.

Electrolyzed water cleans as well as most toxic cleaners and better than others, and EPA-approved lab tests clearly show that it is a superior sanitizer but is completely non-toxic to human or animal cells.

To read the full story in The New Hampshire, Click Here!

Green Tips from Ecotech Pest Control

Apr 3, 2013

From Portsmouth Herald

By Jim Cavan

This week's Green Tips come from Tom Pray and Ecotech Pest Control, an Eliot, Maine-based company specializing in efficient, low-impact alternatives to pest control for ants, ticks, termites and more.

1. If you have gutters, make sure you calibrate them so they drain away from your home's foundation. This will help reduce the kind of damage to decks, steps and wooden siding that ants and termites feed on.

2. If you have wood mulch around your house, make sure it's not touching the foundation. Placing an 18-inch barrier of crushed stone around the foundation will prevent unwanted insects from making their way into the home.

3. Trim the bushes surrounding your home so that they aren't touching the sides of the house. Otherwise, you're giving carpenter ants and other insects a ladder from which to enter the home.

To read the full article, click here!

Chiropractors to Celebrate Office Expansion with Demonstrations, Classes and Children’s Activities

Apr 3, 2013

From the Portsmouth Patch

By Heikki Perry

 

SOUTH BERWICK, Maine — Great Works Chiropractic & Wellness will hold a grand opening celebration for its new office expansion space at 249 Main Street in South Berwick.

The event will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, April 13. Great Works is planning hula hooping demonstrations and classes, a yoga demo, a baby-wearing demo, a salon demo, balloon animals, kids' tattoos and other fun activities to warm up its new place.

Great Works is converting its old space, 235 Main St. into offices and a meeting space. The 249 Main Street address will be the home of the day-to-day operations of the practice.

To read the full story, click here!

 

Electrolyzer Replaces Dangerous Cleaning Agents in the Home and Saves Consumers Money

Apr 3, 2013

From the Portsmouth Patch

By Heikki Perry

Pat Lucci and Gerard Kiley are betting that once consumers learn about their green, innovative and completely safe sanitizer-cleaner they will “make the can of Comet sitting under their kitchen sink the last one they will ever buy.”

Lucci and Kiley are the managing partners of Massachusetts-based Lynnfield Green Technologies, which sells the Toucan–ECO and Toucan Mini, “electrolyzers” that produce a harmless yet effective cleaning and sanitizing solution created from table salt, tap water and a small charge of electricity. The Toucan-ECO takes four minutes — and costs less than a penny — to activate 1.5 liters of electrolyzed water comprising a cleaning and sanitizing solution. The Toucan Mini makes a smaller amount.

The sanitizer half of the machine — hypochlorous acid — according to the EPA, is 80 times more effective than chlorine bleach as a sanitizer, yet it’s completely nontoxic. And the cleanser half — sodium hydroxide — is an effective cleanser that can be used to remove dirt and grease from any device or surface, including food service operations.

“It’s at least as a good as a cleaner and sanitizer as anything you can buy,” says Lucci. “But it’s 100 percent nontoxic. It literally can’t hurt you. The EPA has put hypochlorous acid on a list of chemicals it calls GRAS, an acronym meaning “generally regarded as safe,” meaning it can’t hurt you. So safe is this sanitizer that the EPA has also approved it as a food additive.”

For the full story in the Patch, click here.

Cleaning green: Eatery tries out new product that uses water, salt

Apr 1, 2013

From The Salem News

By Paul Leighton

BEVERLY — As a longtime local breakfast spot, Stephy’s Kitchen is known more for eggs than innovation. But when it comes to its choice of cleaner, the Beckford Street restaurant is trying something new.

Stephy’s recently purchased a cleaning product that turns tap water and table salt into a “green” cleaning solution.

The product, called Toucan-Eco, is sold by Lynnfield Green Technologies, which was co-founded by Beverly resident Patrick Lucci.

“We use it on everything except the fryolator,” Stephy’s Kitchen owner Charles Moutsoulas said. “It’ll do the same job as anything else. It’s the chemicals we don’t want.”

For the full story in The Salem News, click here!