News

People Choosing Adjustments More, Meds Less

Nov 21, 2014

Published in Seacoast Online

By Kristyn Lak Miller

SOUTH BERWICK, Maine — Earlier this year, the World Health Organization (WHO) published a Global Report on Antimicrobial Resistance emphasizing the importance of protecting the effectiveness of antibiotics against common and life-threatening infections. Doing so would help avoid what the WHO warned will be a post-antibiotic era in which common infections and minor injuries can kill. Adjusting to life without antibiotics takes a literal turn when corrective chiropractic care regularly helps address health concerns well beyond back pain.

“Many people seek us out as an alternative to conventional therapies like antibiotics given for ear infections,” said Dr. Seth LaFlamme of Great Works Chiropractic in South Berwick, Maine. “Our patients come in hoping to avoid the drawbacks of other more invasive interventions that often have undesirable side effects. After care, we often find those interventions become unnecessary. It’s not that we’ve sought to replace them, we just attempt to facilitate proper function and healing first, in non-emergency situations only, through a course of neuro-structural correction.”

Read the full story on Seacoast Online.

Eye Health and Diabetes; A Strong Link

Nov 19, 2014

Published in Seacoast Online

By Matthew McCord

PORTSMOUTH – At least a few times a month, a normal eye exam by Dr. Sarah Hudson leads to a recommendation that the patient undergo further testing to check for diabetes.

Hudson, the co-owner with Dr. Amy Pruszenski of Harbor Eyecare Center in Portsmouth, said there is a simple reason for the possible detection of diabetes.

“The eyes let us see and learn about the overall health of our patients. There are more than 200 diseases that can be detected through an eye exam,” Hudson said.

Read the full story on Seacoast Online.

Green Alliance Holds Forum to Help Small Progressive Businesses with Social Media and Staffing

Nov 18, 2014

Published on Seacoast Online

By Katie Seraikas

PORTSMOUTH- Running a business is a lot like solving a puzzle. There are so many pieces that need to come together to get you to that final product or vision. You can work tirelessly at the puzzle, arranging the mish mashed shapes into a cohesive unit, only to find you’re missing a piece. With a lot of focus and attentiveness, the puzzle will eventually come together but most small business owners need help.

“One of the things we have found that most of our partnering businesses struggle with, is using the ever-changing social media landscape to help grow a business or a brand and the other common problem area for many small biz owners is hiring, firing and managing existing employees,” explains Sarah Brown, Green Alliance director and founder. “So we thought we’d bring folks together with experts in these fields and help to get them educated on strategies that work!”

Read the full story onSeacoast Online

Windows to the Body: The Link Between Eye Health and Diabetes

Nov 18, 2014

Published on Portsmouth Patch

By Michael McCord

PORTSMOUTH – At least a few times a month, a normal eye exam by Dr. Sarah Hudson leads to a recommendation that the patient undergo further testing to check for diabetes.

Hudson, the co-owner with Dr. Amy Pruszenski of Harbor Eyecare Center in Portsmouth, said there is a simple reason for the possible detection of diabetes. “The eyes let us see and learn about the overall health of our patients. There are more than 200 diseases that can be detected through an eye exam,” Hudson said.

November is National Diabetes Month and Hudson said despite overall public knowledge about the dangers of diabetes, most patients don’t make the connection between annual eye exams and detecting diabetes. Eye exams can be a critical step in early diabetes diagnosis and treatment.

Read the full story on Patch.com.

Nonprofit Looks to Keep Boardwalk Afloat in the Great Bay

Nov 18, 2014

Published on Portsmouth Patch

By Mark Quirk

Whenever a school bus pulls into the Great Bay Discovery Center, Peter Wellenberger can’t help but chuckle to himself. Seeing the smiling, amazed looks on the children’s faces as they exit the bus and look at the Great Bay Estuary never gets old for him. But the real joy comes later.

“What’s really exciting is when a school bus comes with school kids and (some of the children) come back on Saturday with their family,” said Wellenberger, executive director of the Great Bay Stewards. “It’s just a great place to go.”

For 22 years one of the biggest attractions at the center has been the quarter-mile boardwalk that meanders through and around the Great Bay Estuary. With its unique view of the Great Bay and the wildlife that lives there, it has also served as an educational tool. Thousands of local school children and adults have utilized the boardwalk over the years to better understand the importance of the bay’s ecosystem.

Read the full story on Patch.com.

Benefit Corporation Coming to New Hampshire; Progressive Businesses Strive to Be Early Adopters of Novel Legislation

Nov 18, 2014

Published in Seacoast Online and Patch

Starting January 1, 2015, qualifying New Hampshire businesses can join corporations in over 25 states with a benefit corporation legal status. The Green Alliance, along with W.S. Badger Company, Inc. and Nearby Registry hope to be among the first in the state to adopt this status. This new legislation will help companies include both the public and the environment in their business plans in a new, defendable and promotable way.

Companies that choose benefit corporation status pledge to make a tangible, positive impact on the environment and the community. Businesses designated as benefit corporations make a commitment to meet higher standards of corporate purpose, accountability and transparency. These companies account not only for profit in their business plan but also include people and the environment in what is known as the triple bottom line.

Click here to read the full story on Seacoast Online
To read the full story on Patch, click here.

Meet a Green Alliance Business: Larry Russell, Financial Representative for Northwestern Mutual

Nov 17, 2014

Published in the Portsmouth Herald and on Seacoast Online

Who: Larry Russell, Financial Representative for Northwestern Mutual

What: As a financial representative with Northwestern Mutual, Larry Russell takes into account his client's wellness and lifestyle choices, a key component when developing what Russell refers to as the pyramid of wealth health. Looking at health, dental, life, disability and long-term care insurances, Russell develops three-tiers of financial planning: risk management, savings and wealth creation, legacy or estate planning and estate distribution. Russell believes that living a more sustainable life is not only good for a person's own health and the health of the environment, but is also valuable for financial health. Russell can help clients discover mutual funds with green or socially-responsible companies and offer the eco-focused community a method to plan for a future that stays true to their green values. In his day-to-day dealings with clients and in the office, Russell is adamant about implementing an in-office recycling system, using a digital filing system instead of paper and emailing documents in lieu of standard mailing practices.

Where: 30 International Drive, Suite 101, Pease International Tradeport in Portsmouth.

Read the full story in the Portsmouth Herald or on Seacoast Online.
 

Is group net metering the new model for energy?

Nov 14, 2014

Published in New Hampshire Magazine

By Jeff Woodburn

“God made the country,” observed 16th century poet and hymnodist William Cowper, “and man made the town.” Here in North Sandwich — between the foothills of Mount Whiteface, one of the White Mountains’ smallest 4,000 footers and the village of Center Sandwich — the idyllic scene that opened each episode of the 1980s sitcom “Newhart” is the Dragonfly Yoga Barn Studio and Retreat.

It is a cluster of 18th century barns that have been recycled and repurposed into a yoga retreat by Declan and Katie O’Connell. But hidden beyond the peace and serenity of this spot is a cutting-edge, small-scale energy generation project that changes not so much how energy is produced but how it is shared and financed. It is a model that is creating a boomlet in small ventures.

Read the full story in New Hampshire Magazine.

Little Green Homes Increasingly Popular

Nov 14, 2014

Published in Business NH Magazine

By Michael McCord

A recent trend in sustainable housing is also one of the most obvious – building smaller from the beginning.

A case in point is a recently completed home on Kittery Point designed and built by Greenland-based Little Green Homes. “The family had a home in Portsmouth but they wanted to downsize quite a bit,” said Jeff Stacy, business partner at Little Green Homes.

Late in 2013, the Portsmouth couple approached Stacy and fellow business partner Chris Redmond with their vision and goals for their new home for the two-adult, one-child family. The result is a comfortable two-story, two-bedroom home totaling 1,150 square feet built with as much recycled and reused material as possible – which included parts from an old barn.

The new structure has a cupola, sliding glass door for a wide natural view, and a durable metal roof. It also maximizes space utility and leverages insulation to create a comfortable, energy efficient home.

Read the full story here.

Green Collar Careers: Jen Kennedy, Co-founder of the Blue Ocean Society

Nov 13, 2014

Published in The New Hampshire and Patch

By Anna Murphy

UNH and Cornell graduate Jen Kennedy, along with research partner, Dianna Schulte, founded the Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation in 2001 with the mission to protect marine mammals in the Gulf of Maine through education, research and conservation. Since then, the organization has grown to include the Blue Ocean Discovery Center at Hampton Beach. A non-profit research and education organization, BOS strives to connect the public with marine life and the coastal environment. Part of that connection includes inspiring and encouraging young, future marine biologists' interest in marine life conservation.

Through several outreach programs, the Blue Ocean Society brings the Gulf of Maine to children with engaging, age-appropriate learning. School and group programs include: Traveling Tide Pools, Marine Biology Day, Bag It (a presentation about America's dependence on plastic bags) and Get "Eaten" by an Inflatable Whale, the last of which includes an interactive program where students walk inside a 65 foot, blow-up fin whale named Ladder.

To read to complete story in TNH, click here and go to page 15. 

Click here to read the full story on Patch.