Blog : Green Initiatives

For Immediate Release: Green Alliance Launches Kickstarter Campaign for new “Naked Bullfrog” Platform

By mbellamente | Nov 29, 2016 | in

Sample Tweets:
@Green_Alliance launches @kickstarter to raise funds for #NakedBullfrog, a directory of kick-ass businesses: http://kck.st/2ghxETp

Introducing the #NakedBullfrog #GreenRevolution! Let’s break the internet with our Kickstarter campaign: http://kck.st/2ghxETp

GREENLAND, NH:  The Green Alliance, a New Hampshire-based PR firm, is launching a Kickstarter campaign to raise capital for a new platform called the Naked Bullfrog. Billed as an interactive resource for sustainable living, the Naked Bullfrog enables users to find and refer local business committed to sustainability.

Chinburg Properties Honored by EPA as a 2016 Energy Star® Partner of the Year

By Mike Bellamente | Apr 15, 2016 | in

Karen Breen and Lori Bachand of Chinburg Properties Accept the Award from Jacob Moss- Acting Deputy Director for the Climate Protection Partnerships Division.Newmarket, NH – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recognized GA business partner Chinburg Properties with a 2016 ENERGY STAR Partner of the Year – New Home Builder Award for its outstanding efforts to bring more energy-efficient homes to market. Chinburg Properties accomplishments were recognized in Washington, D.C. on April 13, 2016, with Karen Breen and Lori Bachand of Chinburg Properties accepting the award from Jacob Moss, Acting Deputy Director for the Climate Protection Partnerships Division.

Chinburg Properties, an ENERGY STAR partner since 2004, was honored for:
New Home Development and Construction. The company is one of only 5 builders nationally to be recognized in this category. 

Is the Christmas Goose Making a Comeback?

By Katelyn | Dec 23, 2015 | in

Sarah Brown, Director of the Green Alliance recently completed her second story on the rising popularity of the 'Christmas Goose' for National Geographic's 'The Plate'. Check out the story below or read it on 'The Plate'

A hundred years ago, a golden-browned goose was a familiar delicacy on December 25th. Scrooge thought it essential to add to poor Bob Cratchet’s table in A Christmas Carol, and a goose who lays golden eggs was a prize in the Jack In the Beanstalk story. But good luck finding one at your average American supermarket today.

The Christmas goose actually traces its roots back to the medieval European feast of Martinmas. St. Martin was revered in Roman times as a spiritual leader and patron of children and the poor. As legend goes, one evening, having learned of his consecration as Bishop, he hid in a barn to avoid what he saw as a title above his humble station, only to be revealed by the loud squawking of geese. Their punishment? Feast fare for centuries to come. But as farming life waned, so did the goose—an animal that requires a long maturation time, much grazing area and time and effort to cook. One New Hampshire farmer is working to bring them back.

“A decade ago, I started reminiscing about the geese we had at Christmas as a kid,” says goose farmer Jim Czack. “I couldn’t find one, and so decided to raise my own. Once I had these noble, engaging creatures on my land I knew this would be much more than just my own Christmas dinner.”

Thus was born Elevage de Volailles in Rye, New Hampshire, a small farm-to-table poultry, duck and goose farm on a tree-lined rural road surrounded by horse barns and country homes. Demand has been so robust that Czack doubled his goose gaggles last year and is tripling them this year.

Less like an Acorn, More like a Giving Tree

By Mike Bellamente | Dec 15, 2015 | in

Local Preschool puts Nature and Giving at the Center of its Mission

Who or what a child becomes as an adult can often be tied directly to their upbringing. Their roots, so to speak. At the Acorn School in Stratham, New Hampshire, this is precisely why it is so important to instill values such as environmental consciousness and community giving into the little minds attending school every day. “We really focus on acts of kindness and generosity in our little universe,” says Crystal Hardy, Acorn School Board Member, “It’s important for us to reinforce the same value structure that they’re being taught at home.” Perhaps this is why, when the holiday season arrives each year, the Acorn School sets its sights on spreading their own brand of joy through a series of events focused on giving back to the community. 

Calling Mr. Bingle.  “Who” you ask? For those not as well-versed on the operational intricacies of the North Pole, Mr. Bingle is the caretaker and chief stall-mucker for all of Santa’s reindeer. While he doesn’t necessarily maintain the same high profile of his bearded, jolly ol’ boss, Mr. Bingle is an annual staple among the students at the Acorn School. Each year, Acorn, in partnership with the Exeter Adult Education program, work with Mr. Bingle and these young philanthropists on a community gift-giving effort that provides over 200 gifts, in the form of blankets, hats and gloves, to people in need throughout the community. The children, in turn, are each bestowed a bell from Mr. Bingle as a Thank You for their kindness.

Futuro Construction Builds an Energy Efficient "Passive House" in Newmarket

By Katelyn | Dec 13, 2015 | in

By Josh Rosenson

In Newmarket New Hampshire a “Passive House” is nearing its completion date as a Portsmouth based construction firm puts on the finishing touches.

Futuro Construction specializes in building high performance residential homes. This forward thinking company has been in business since 2011, and is continually pushing the boundaries by taking energy efficiency and sustainability to a whole new standard.

Since the company’s inception they have focused their efforts on a net-zero concept, which is a self-sustaining method essentially meaning that a home should produce as much energy as it consumes. Futuro’s newest project in Newmarket takes this concept even one step further by building what is called a “Passive House.”

A passive house takes into consideration the quality, comfort, and energy efficiency of a home. Matt Silva, general manager of Futuro, said that they are able to achieve this new standard by making the home more “airtight.”

“The aim is for almost zero air exchange that isn’t managed by the mechanical systems of the home which exchange fresh air into the home,” he said. “As a result, the home owner will not only be more comfortable, but the amount of energy their home consumes will become extremely minimal.”

Conservation, Construction, and Community

By Katelyn | Dec 13, 2015 | in

By Kristyn Lak Miller

Living in a well-built space that’s just the right size. Being within walking distance to amenities. Knowing neighbors by name. “When it comes to choosing a home, traditional values are making a comeback,” says Jen Chinburg, Marketing Director for Chinburg Properties, the 30-year-old development and construction firm. “There’s a real interest in returning to priorities-driven, thoughtfully-constructed, community-based residences, downtown and beyond.”

Newmarket-based Chinburg Properties worked with its hometown on two developments to infuse tradition into modern living: Newmarket Mills, a downtown mix of rental apartments and commercial space, and Rockingham Green, a lifestyle community just minutes from the town’s center. “These developments have changed the way people look at Newmarket, and the way the people of Newmarket look at themselves,” says Steve Fournier, Newmarket Town Manager. “I am a New Hampshire seacoast native. When I was growing up, Newmarket was known mainly as a depressed mill town that provided inexpensive housing for students at UNH. Today, thanks in part to these developments, Newmarket is one of the hottest markets in the area.”

Apartment Living Grows Up, Goes Green, and Gets Connected

Newmarket Manufacturing Company constructed its first mill in Newmarket nearly 200 years ago, harnessing the power of the Lamprey River for textile production. Several mills were added during the century that followed and, during peak production, more than 700 were employed. The company closed in 1929 and the mills housed various tenants over the years, including Sam Smith Shoe Co. and Timberland. Though the mills dominated downtown, and long symbolized the town’s industriousness, they steadily fell into disrepair and, by the 1990s, became solemn reminders of Newmarket’s prosperous past.

Newmarket Dental: A Leader in Green Dentistry

By Katelyn | Dec 10, 2015 | in

By Michael McCord

Nate Swanson was trained to be a dentist but his green epiphany was prompted by a simple observation: it was all about the trash.

In Swanson’s case it was medical trash piled up in a back room of a dental practice he worked at years ago. He took a close look for the first time at what he was seeing and it reminded him of a movie scene. “The situation was reminiscent of the trash compactor in Star Wars,” Swanson said. “I thought of the other offices in the same complex, the number of complexes on that road, and so on… it was insane to think of the waste being generated. I thought there had to be a better way.”

Almost a decade after he purchased Newmarket Dental, Swanson has scripted a green approach to dentistry. In the process, he has created a working homage to both sustainability and the bottom line. “If there’s a green option that’s not ridiculously more expensive, I will take it,” said Swanson, a dental school graduate of The Ohio State University who moved to New England from the Midwest in 2002. “We have proven that patients appreciate what we are doing and it typically improves the overall quality of their care.”

Local Bottler and Recycling Organization Team Up to Tackle Glass Recycling Problem

By Katelyn | Dec 7, 2015 | in

By Josh Rosenson

Bedford – A partnership between a large NH company and a state-wide non-profit has the Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Northern New England (CCNNE) and New Hampshire the Beautiful (NHtB) leading the way in helping to solve the growing problem of recycling glass products.

Ray Dube, sustainability manager for CCNNE, is also a member of the NHtB Board of Directors. He summed up the glass recycling problem – an issue he says people are often shocked to learn exists – as consisting of two main challenges; public insistence on glass for certain products and the incredibly costly process of transporting and then recycling it.

The challenge glass poses begins with the marketplace, because while most vendors have been trying to move away from glass, they immediately run up against consumer preference for glass. CCNNE, for example, uses glass for less than one percent of its products. But the liquor industry, in particular beer and wine purveyors, continues to struggle to sell products that are not in glass bottles after decades of the perception that glass holds a more quality product.

But while consumers have come to expect certain liquids in glass containers, most don’t realize just how costly glass can be, and just how much glass can add to the carbon footprint of a product. Dube explains. “The first part of the problem is the weight of the bottles on the trucks for transport,” adding that about half of each truck carrying glass bottles is empty due to weight limits on highways. While trucks can only be half-filled with glass, a truck can be filled full with plastic bottles.

Global Warming Pushes Maple Trees, Syrup to the Brink

By Katelyn | Dec 2, 2015 | in

Sarah Brown, Director of the Green Alliance recently completed a story on climate change and its impact on the maple syrup industry in the Northeast for National Geographic's 'The Plate'. Check out the intro below and read the full story on 'The Plate'.

The polar bear is a powerful symbol of the effects of climate change in the Arctic. Here in New England, our symbol may soon be the sugar maple tree. Tapped for syrup for centuries and famous for its fall foliage, the sugar maple is stressed to the point of decline and many scientists studying this beloved tree believe rising temperatures are the cause.

Maple syrup’s use as a food was first recorded in the early 1600s, when French writer Marc Lescarbot noted that Native American tribes “get juice from the trees and distill it down into a very sweet and agreeable liquid.” The syrup lore goes like this: A chief threw a tomahawk at a tree and noticed the rich syrup dripping from it. His wife cooked that evening’s venison in the sweet syrup, and the rest is history.

But what is a uniquely North American product is also an exceptionally picky one, dependent on a narrow and highly specialized climate of freezing nights and mild days. In the 1950s and 60s, eighty percent of the world’s maple syrup came from the U.S., 20 percent from Canada. Today it’s the opposite.

Go Green This Black Friday!

By Katelyn | Nov 24, 2015 | in

Every year, millions of shoppers swarm to big box stores, on a mission to score the best deals for everyone on their list. Aside from the documented stampedes that have occurred, the frustration of finding a parking spot, and so on, there are a number of great reasons to ditch the lines this Friday.

With that said, we propose "Green Friday" in place of "Black Friday." For the next week, purchase a Green Alliance Membership for only $20, (regularly $35), through our Green Friday promotion! The GA Membership allows you to visit some of your favorite local shops and eateries, (to refuel for more shopping, of course), while enjoying discounts at nearly 100 local, sustainable businesses.

Going Green this Friday not only supports the local economy, at a time when your fellow community members could use the business the most to support their family, but ensures that you are getting great, quality products that are truly unique. Whether you opt to become a GA Member and take advantage of these generous discounts this season, or are just looking to score the best products available, we urge everyone to think locally.

Meet a Green Alliance Business: Minute Men Painters

By Katelyn | Nov 23, 2015 | in

In an industry progressively moving toward chemical-free products, Minute Men Painters leads the charge in using environmentally friendly paints, varnishes and finishes. Co-owners Sean Sturk and Chris Tufts made the decision to switch when a co-worker started to lose his sense of smell after being exposed to the harsh chemicals in oil-based paints.For Sturk, it was an eye-opening experience and one he didn’t want to subject his customers to.

According to the EPA, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can cause eye, nose and throat irritation, frequent headaches, nausea and can also damage the liver, kidney and the central nervous system. With little difference in cost to the homeowner, Minute Men Painters uses water-based, no or low-VOC paints as a default.

Containing anywhere from 50 percent to 90 percent water, the environmental impact from water-based paint is significantly less than oil-based paint. Minute Men not only paints the interior and exterior of buildings and homes, they've expanded their scope of work to include finish work on cabinets as well as fine furniture painting and antique glazing.

Wishing You a Green Thanksgiving

By Katelyn | Nov 23, 2015 | in

As we prepare for family to arrive to celebrate Thanksgiving, our friends at Maine Interfaith Power and Light have put together a few tips for a more eco-friendly and healthy holiday.

EAT LESS MEAT
Consider replacing your traditional meat dish with creative, vegetarian alternatives. The New York Times recently published its annual roundup of tasty vegetarian fare for Thanksgiving. Also, find fabulous Tofurky recipes courtesy of Farm Sanctuary (Turkey rescue). See what a vegan holiday menu looks like, courtesy of Robin Robertson — one of America’s bestselling vegetarian cookbook authors. Yum!

CHOOSE ORGANIC AND HUMANELY RAISED
If you eat meat, look for free-range organic options at your grocery store using the Environmental Working Group’s Meat Eater’s Guide to Climate Change. These are from animals that are fed grains or grasses that are organically grown and free of synthetic pesticides, and thus require less fossil fuel energy.

A USDA Organic label ensures that the meat was not produced with pesticides, irradiation, hormones, antibiotics, or bioengineering and a Certified Humane label ensures that the turkey was raised in humane conditions. Find a grocer near you that carries Certified Humane meat. You can also consider a heritage turkey, or choose from a variety of sustainable fish.

Giving Energy Efficiency a Number that Matters

By Katelyn | Nov 21, 2015 | in

By Michael McCord

Since its founding in 2008, Yankee Thermal Imaging has helped hundreds of residential and commercial clients reap maximum benefits from energy efficiency efforts. Recently the New England based company has been working on compiling hard numbers to quantify their financial and environmental effectiveness.

The numbers are in, and the carbon footprint reduction they have helped their customers achieve is impressive. “Collectively, we’ve saved our customers about 1.6 million pounds of CO2 emissions annually since we’ve been in business and counting,” said Cara Eisele, Yankee Thermal Imaging’s business development manager. “We started compiling the data about six months ago, and we are really excited to let our customers know the impact they are making.”

Eisele said the money savings for their customers who follow through with enhanced insulation upgrades and energy saving measures have also been significant. Depending on current fuel prices, she explained, “we estimate customers have saved on average $850 annually on their utility bills, some are higher, some lower.” Translated into a pollution saving metric, Yankee Thermal Imaging estimates the combined CO2 savings achieved is the equivalent of taking between 220 and 240 automobiles off of the road each year.

Green Story: Integrated Fitness of Dover and Epping

By Craig | Nov 19, 2015 | in

Every Green Alliance business undergoes a three part Sustainability Certification. This certification serves to show what each business has accomplished and what they are still working to accomplish when it comes to green business practices. The final part of the evaluation is the Green Story. Check out Integrated Fitness's Green Story below.

Integrated Fitness Offers a Sustainable Approach to Fitness

Jonathan Arnold is in the business of changing people's lives. At Integrated Fitness of Dover and Epping, Jon works with clients to help them lose weight, build muscle; eat healthier and meet personal goals for a more balanced lifestyle.

To lead these comprehensive, and sometimes rigorous, classes, Integrated Fitness's trainers are specially certified to help clients reach their individual health goals. In addition to Jon's expertise, Integrated Fitness has four personal trainers and two group exercise instructors on staff for private, one-on-one training, as well as group sessions that include the Weight Loss Challenge program, Strength Training classes and more. And the trainers at Integrated Fitness go beyond just the physical workout at the studio, with one-on-one nutrition consulting and a nutrition class as part of the Weight Loss Challenge program.

It was a meeting with a nutritionist as a teenager that changed the way Jon thought about what he ate, and helped to build his confidence. That fateful meeting influenced the way Jon continued to think about wellness into his adult years. As a paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne Division, Jon maintained an active, healthy, regimented lifestyle. But when his tour of duty was over, and he returned to civilian life, Jon became complacent and unhealthy.

A Sustainable Approach to Golf Course Management

By Craig | Nov 17, 2015 | in

richard luffBy Michael McCord

The terms sustainability and golf don’t easily mix well. Golf courses have been known for decades for their excessive use of water and pesticides to create pristine green playing conditions. But Richard Luff, the president and co-owner of Sagamore Hampton Golf Club in North Hampton, is part of a family tradition stretching back to the late 1920s that set itself part – so much so that Luff co-authored book on using ecologically sound methods pioneered by his father Peter.
“The variables we face in maintaining a golf course provide continual challenges on a daily basis,” Luff explained. “Coming up with alternatives to conventional methods that consider the short and long term sustainability of the golf course and surrounding ecosystem is very rewarding.”

The Luffs opened their first public golf course Sagamore Springs in Lynnfield, Mass. in 1929 and the second in 1962 in North Hampton New Hampshire. Richard Luff has been in the family business “all his life” and returned to his native Seacoast area after graduating from the University of Vermont. He said his father had decided long ago to apply the lessons of organic gardening to golf course management – in part because he saw the dangers of excessive chemical use that was becoming the norm in the 1950s and 1960s.

Going against the grain, the senior Peter Luff used a minimal amount of chemicals and focused on nourishing the ground to produce quality grass. Richard Luff has picked up the mantle and advanced it further through extensive use of organic fertilizer, natural applications to replace pesticides, and the use of a small wind turbine to offset some energy costs.

A few years after Peter Luff’s death in 1998, Luff co-wrote the book “Ecological Golf Course Management” with Paul Sachs, a longtime friend of Peter. “Paul was the real force (behind the book) but we wanted to preserve and share what my father practiced for decades,” Luff said.

New Hampshire the Beautiful Partners with the Laconia Area Community Land Trust for America Recycles Day

By Katelyn | Nov 17, 2015 | in

Laconia Area Community Land Trust (LACLT) has been recognized as a NeighborWorks Green Organization for its comprehensive commitment to sustainable operations. To achieve this designation, LACLT was required to demonstrate adherence to a rigorous set of green business practices across its operations and all program areas.

A few of LACLT’s green achievements include 32 LEED certified units in Meredith, 47 EnergyStar® certified units in Tilton with PV electrical generation and solar hot water, 48 units in Wolfeboro with 20 solar arrays for hot water, and 6 EnergyStar® certified units and 6 panel solar electric system at Mechanic School in Laconia.

Currently under construction is the River’s Edge project that will have many green features. Located in Laconia this 32 unit project will include a community river walk that will connect to other paths in the city, Filterra boxes, green design elements, and the use of hydropower. LACLT is proud of its green accomplishments and looks forward to doing even more with future projects and as an organization.

To celebrate this accomplishment, to continue their commitment to being green, and to celebrate America Recycles Day on November 15th, LACLT initiated single-stream recycling at Lochmere Meadows in Tilton and Pinecrest in Meredith. Six information sessions were held at the properties with tenants and each household were given a recycling bin to aid in their recycling efforts. Bins were provided to LACLT at a discounted price by New Hampshire the Beautiful.

Seasonal Home Renovations: Greening Your Home From the Inside Out

By Katelyn | Nov 15, 2015 | in

 

By Anne Twombly

 

With chilly weather rolling into the state, New Hampshire residents are spending more time inside, so it’s no surprise that many homeowners start interior renovation projects this time of year in order to make their personal spaces more comfortable and efficient during heating season. But before siphoning cash from your nest egg, consider the social and environmental effects or your home renovation. We have compiled a list of tips to consider when improving your home.

 

1. Conduct a Professional Energy Audit

If you’re considering making any structural renovation to your home’s interior to increase heating efficiency, the first step should be getting an energy audit from a reputable source. Yankee Thermal Imaging is a Rochester-based company that specializes in implementing thermal imaging techniques when conducting comprehensive energy audits. Identifying temperature fluctuations around a home is the first step in addressing energy and insulation efficiency.

“Thermal imaging is just one of the techniques used in a comprehensive energy audit,” Chris Meyer, Yankee Thermal’s owner and founder, explains. “But it’s not the only thing we use. We have a wide range of tools to figure out where energy is being wasted and then more importantly, the expertise to implement upgrades and retrofits to improve efficiency.”

Meyer says the program results in substantial energy savings without significant investment. Implementation can be completed in a day and can pay for itself in less than two years. For the cost of approximately two oil deliveries, homeowners can dramatically reduce their annual heating and cooling costs, as well as their carbon footprint.

Conservation, Construction, and Community

By Katelyn | Nov 13, 2015 | in

By Kristyn Lak Miller

Living in a well-built space that’s just the right size. Being within walking distance to amenities. Knowing neighbors by name. “When it comes to choosing a home, traditional values are making a comeback,” says Jen Chinburg, Marketing Director for Chinburg Properties, the 30-year-old development and construction firm. “There’s a real interest in returning to priorities-driven, thoughtfully-constructed, community-based residences, downtown and beyond.”

Newmarket-based Chinburg Properties worked with its hometown on two developments to infuse tradition into modern living: Newmarket Mills, a downtown mix of rental apartments and commercial space, and Rockingham Green, a lifestyle community just minutes from the town’s center. “These developments have changed the way people look at Newmarket, and the way the people of Newmarket look at themselves,” says Steve Fournier, Newmarket Town Manager. “I am a New Hampshire seacoast native. When I was growing up, Newmarket was known mainly as a depressed mill town that provided inexpensive housing for students at UNH. Today, thanks in part to these developments, Newmarket is one of the hottest markets in the area.”

Apartment Living Grows Up, Goes Green, and Gets Connected

Newmarket Manufacturing Company constructed its first mill in Newmarket nearly 200 years ago, harnessing the power of the Lamprey River for textile production. Several mills were added during the century that followed and, during peak production, more than 700 were employed. The company closed in 1929 and the mills housed various tenants over the years, including Sam Smith Shoe Co. and Timberland. Though the mills dominated downtown, and long symbolized the town’s industriousness, they steadily fell into disrepair and, by the 1990s, became solemn reminders of Newmarket’s prosperous past.

Meet a Green Alliance Business: TVC Systems

By Craig | Nov 11, 2015 | in

TVC Systems is a Portsmouth-based control and information systems integration company specializing in supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems. TVC provides a way to control and/or monitor on site combined heat and power (CHP) systems for critical power plants, boiler plants, utility plants and other energy centers and buildings across varying industries, while helping those industries' power, heating and cooling systems to be up to 80 percent more efficient.

Its services include the study, design, implementation and maintenance of co-generation and tri-generation systems in plants that include boilers, turbines, reciprocating engines, heat recovery steam generators, electric and/or adsorption chillers, etc. CHP also reduces air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, requires less fuel to produce a given energy output, avoids transmission and distribution losses that occur when electricity travels over power lines and provides high-quality electricity and thermal energy to a site regardless of what might occur on the power grid. In many cases, energy produced can also be sold back to the local utility supplier. In 2013, TVC Systems was recognized by the Environmental Protection Agency/CHP Partnership for its participation in 22 successfully implemented and completed CHP projects, resulting in significant power efficiencies and emission reductions. TVC is currently in the final design, startup and commissioning phases of four additional CHP projects and continues to upgrade and improve existing facilities.

Where: 284 Constitution Ave., Portsmouth, N.H.

Web: www.tvcsystems.com

Phone: (603) 431-5251

Little Green Homes Welcomes New Subsidiary, Spruce Creek Woodworks

By Katelyn | Nov 10, 2015 | in

Many area residents are familiar with Little Green Homes, an environmentally friendly building company, located in Greenland, NH, and the local business has recently grown with the addition of Spruce Creek Woodworks. The new subsidiary of Little Green Homes specializes in custom furniture, cabinetry, and woodworking for both residential and commercial properties.

The craftsmen have experience in a variety of different areas of woodworking, giving them knowledge of many different specialties. For Spruce Creek, it isn’t just about the final product, it’s about the entire process of building, beginning with design and working through materials, installation and follow up after completion of the project.

While Spruce Creek Woodworks is new to the seacoast area, Little Green Homes is not. The business, founded by Chris Redmond and Jeff Stacy in 2007, has become well known throughout the area, including in 2009 when Little Green Homes was part of the first Platinum LEED build in Portsmouth.

Since then, they have grown to create sustainable, durable, and more energy efficient homes for residents who want to step outside the box when it comes to home design. One recent project is the construction of an all-electric house in Kittery Point, home to Ann Grinnell and Marge Pelletier.