Blog : October 2015

Art of Reuse Event to Benefit the Post-Landfill Action Network

By Katelyn | Oct 7, 2015 | in

Join the Post-Landfill Action Network for an evening benefit of art, hors d'oeuvres, and community as they celebrate reuse at the 3s Artspace in Portsmouth on Sunday, October 11, from 4:00 - 6:00 p.m. The Art of Reuse will feature local and nationally recognized artists who incorporate found objects, recycled materials, or messages about consumption and waste into their work.

The Post-Landfill Action Network (PLAN) is a New Hampshire-based nonprofit working with student leaders across the country to build a world where landfills and incinerators are obsolete. The organization was founded by the creators of the UNH Trash 2 Treasure program, which helps students combat waste on their college campuses.

In 2011, University of New Hampshire students created Trash 2 Treasure after noticing mounds of perfectly useable items from spring move out, only to see them reappear when students moved back in that fall. To end the cycle of waste, they collected items discarded by students in the spring, cleaned and organized those items over the summer, and sold them to students moving back to campus in the fall.

UNH Hosts Free Seminar: "All About Internships for Employers"

By Anne | Oct 7, 2015 | in
The Green Alliance doesn’t just promote your business; we also connect you with the right resources to help you grow in every way possible. It’s to the end that we share with you this valuable information about utilizing interns in your organization. 
 
Your business is successful because of your customers, your managers, your employees and your interns. Interns? Of course! It can be very effective to hire somebody who already knows your business. 
 
Here at the Green Alliance, one of our most valuable players was once a humble intern. Our Community and Member Manager, Katelyn Monroe (pictured left), got her in at the GA through a UNH internship.
 
Join our friends at UNH for a free and informative seminar, “All About Internships for Employers” on Tuesday, October 13th from noon to 2 p.m. at the Memorial Union Building. 
 

Solar Energy Advocates Call for Net Metering Cap Raise

By Anne | Oct 7, 2015 | in
 
By Michael McCord
 
Two local alternative energy business owners are part of a growing chorus pushing the New Hampshire legislature to change the state’s net metering law.  To not expand the legal cap, advocates says, would put a serious economic damper on renewable energy growth in the state.
 
“The shame in all of this is that the message clearly didn’t get across to the legislature during the last session,” said Andrew Kellar, the founder of NHsolarGarden.com, the Stratham-based developer of solar energy projects. Kellar acknowledged that the political fight over the state budget was the top priority but said the lack of action could have consequences. “The inaction could lead to projects potentially evaporating,” he said.
 
Jack Bingham, the owner of Seacoast Energy in Barrington, has met with local representatives from both political parties to educate and emphasize the importance of increasing the net metering cap.  
 
“There are a whole host of issues here but the most important one is that neighboring states like Massachusetts, Vermont and New York have a very different posture,” Bingham said. “They don’t have caps or if they do, and they are much hig
her. Vermont pays a feed-in tariff of five to six cents above retail to encourage growth. The cap in New Hampshire stifles alternative energy growth.”
 
The concept of net metering has caught on nationally and works like this at the basic level: it allows those who generate their own power to sell excessive use to utilities. This billing arrangement allows renewable energy generation systems to spin the electric meter backward when the system is producing more electricity than is being used onsite, thereby exporting electricity to the grid for others to use. The customer receives a credit or payment for the net exported electricity.

Join the Green Alliance on Our Sustaining Member Sail

By Katelyn | Oct 7, 2015 | in

Show your commitment to the local green economy with a lifetime membership with the Green Alliance and help us work with more local businesses and expand to more surrounding communities. Become a Sustaining Member and you'll receive 4 free tickets on our Fall Foliage Sunset Party Sail- our way of saying thank you for your ongoing support. 

Are you already a Green Alliance member and like the work we do and what we stand for? We invite existing Green Alliance members to step up their yearly membership to a lifetime membership and when they do, they'll receive 4 free tickets aboard our sail on October 15, from 5:00 - 7:00 p.m. with the Gundalow Company

A Sustaining Membership is a lifetime individual membership and gets you unlimited GA Business Discounts, Green Alliance events and cutting edge environmental information. Sustaining Members never have to renew and are telling us and the world that they believe in the power of a local green economy.Since the Green Alliance’s creation in 2009, Sustaining Members have provided unwavering support to the mission to grow the local, green economy.

This sail will showcase beautiful Portsmouth foliage, a picturesque sunset, and great networking with those who are equally as committed to the conservation of the local environment and economy.The GA Foliage Sail is an excellent opportunity to enjoy autumn on a genuine replica of a gundalow, a historic vessel used to navigate the New Hampshire coastline. Complementary appetizers and beers will be served, and guests will enjoy live music aboard the boat.

Upgrade to a Sustaining Membership or become a new Sustaining Member and email katelyn@greenalliance.biz to save your 4 free tickets.

Coca-Cola teams up with the Ocean Conservatory to Combat Marine Plastic

By Anne | Oct 6, 2015 | in
 
The Ocean Conservancy, a non-profit dedicated to protecting and preserving the ocean, is seeking to tackle the problem of marine plastic pollution once and for all with the help of Coca-Cola.
 
The problem itself is vast, with 8 million metric tons of plastic having “leaked” into the ocean to date. The non-profit recently released a report serving as a “call to arms” for industry officials, politicians and citizens collaborate in preventing any more plastic from meeting ocean water. The report identified five countries as the main culprits contributing to the volume of marine plastic, including; China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam.
 

Favorite Foods Continues to Lead ‘Green’ by Example

By Anne | Oct 6, 2015 | in
 
By Rich Collins
 
SOMERSWORTH -  For the past 27 years, Favorite Foods, a New Hampshire based food distribution company, made it its mission to provide superior quality food distribution and service to their clients, typically independent restaurants, in New Hampshire, Maine, and central and northern Massachusetts. Family owned and operated by son Kelly, father Chris Barstow, and mother Petra Barstow both have always held a strong belief that Favorite Foods could run both profitably and efficiently, with a company-wide focus to improve its overall environmental footprint.
 
Favorite Foods has had many green successes to date, including a massive 572 Panel, 140 kW Solar installation, and the Barstow family is focused on continuously lessening their impact on the environment, increasing energy efficiencies and continuing their mission to maintain a sustainable business. Locally, Favorite Foods has had a longtime relationship with the Green Alliance, a union of local, sustainable businesses and members working to unite the green community.
 
The company’s latest ‘green’ effort was prompted not only by its continuous drive to improve efficiencies, but also by the realities of the significant energy use involved in large-scale refrigeration. 

FootGolf Gives Local Soccer Teams Dynamic Edge

By Katelyn | Oct 5, 2015 | in

By Anne Twombly

Mini golf is a classic American pastime, a simplified and strategically edited version of golf’s traditional gameplay. Whereas traditional golf involves a large sprawling natural landscape, a spectrum of varied clubs, and heavily technical gameplay, mini golf is played in a shrunken, often fantastical, manufactured course allowing for faster paced game transitions between erratic swings of a one-size fits all standardized club. A concentrated dose of the marketable highlights of the traditional golf experience, mini golf aims to please the masses.

Like mini golf, FootGolf, an up-and-coming hybrid of soccer and golf, borrows the latter’s perceived highlights. However, contrary to the aspects hailed in mini golf, a Foot Golf course traditionally runs within or directly parallel to a traditional golf course.

Sagamore –Hampton Golf Club began offering FootGolf just last year, a welcome addition to the facility by both staff and local players. At Sagamore, the hybrid sport has met with success partly because of its symbiotic relationship with the club’s traditional 18-hole course.

“Typically, per hole, there’s two FootGolf holes. The yardages range anywhere from our shortest hole which is 50 yards to our longest hole which is 165 yards - those being par five,” said Kate Blais, Clubhouse Manager at Sagamore.”

Fast Festive 5k Benefits Great Cause

By Katelyn | Oct 5, 2015 | in

By Anne Twombly

STRATHAM - For many fall is a time to reflect on the ecological beauty of the state before the warm weather dissipates. It’s only natural that The Great Bay Stewards, an organization dedicated to conservation and preservation of the New Hampshire’s Great Bay Estuary, would host their annual 5k at the apex of the season. This year the race will be held at 9 a.m. on Saturday, October 24 at Sandy Hill Road in Stratham.

The Great Bay 5K Road Race is a primary fundraiser for the Great Bay Stewards, with proceeds supporting the non-profit’s educational and stewardship programs as well as facility improvement projects. Along with sponsoring erosion control efforts, invasive species removal, and runoff prevention campaigns, the non-profit also funds the Great Bay Discovery Center, an educational hub of the Research Reserve.

The Discovery Center offers visitors a chance to learn more about ecology and marine biology issues involving the Great Bay. The Stewards help manage over 6,000 acres of protected land. Only one acre is developed, which houses the Great Bay Discovery Center, with the other 5,999 acres providing prime estuary habitat, recreation space and undisturbed wetland area.

Spooktacular Kids Festival this Saturday at Stratham Hill Park

By Katelyn | Oct 5, 2015 | in

Stop by the Spooktacular Kids Festival at Stratham Hill Park this Saturday, October 10, from 10 am to 4 pm. The day will feature a spooky fun run, music, magic, train ride, face painting, games, crafts, a toy flea market, food trucks, and promises to have a little something for everybody.

The Spooktacular Kids Festival will benefit Rett's Roost, a sanctuary for families with a child affected by cancer. Rett's Roost is a non-profit organization established by Jim and Deana Cavan in memory of their son Everett "Rett" Cavan who passed away from pediatric cancer at just 10 months old.

Jim Cavan worked as the Director of Media at the Green Alliance for five years, and although he continues to write for publications in the area, Jim and Deana have made it their mission to honor Rett. In memory of Rett, the Cavans launched Rett’s Roost in early July. Families attend these “Roosts” free of charge and to cover expenses, Deana and Jim plan to conduct regular fundraisers to supplement individual donations.

Fall is Still Active Season for Wasps

By Craig | Oct 5, 2015 | in

At a family outing to a nearby apple orchard they swarm around crushed apple cores, spilled cups of cider and sticky trash bins. Even with autumn’s crisp evening air, wasps are still active.

Already this fall Tom Pray, of Ecotech Pest Services in Eliot, Maine, says there have been a number of reports regarding large wasp nests both inside and outside of homes, with nests growing to the size of volleyballs and hanging like a paper lantern under an eave or porch.

"Last year we had a bumper crop of bald face hornets and wasp nests. We're probably seeing the result of that," Pray said. "All those nest sites last year created new queens for this year, so a large number of them survived last winter, built large nests during the summer and seek warmth as the weather cools again."

Homeowners can take some minor precautions themselves by walking their property both inside and out to check for nests, which remain active until mid-November.

Each of the varying wasp species, over a dozen in New Hampshire, have a favorite place to build, which is why many homeowners find nests in the ground, hanging from a tree and hidden in the wall or attic of a house. If a homeowner, or business owner, finds a nest on their property Pray insists they call him instead of taking matters into their own hands with over-the-counter insecticides.

"People shouldn’t go after a nest site with a can of Raid, that’s like bringing a knife to a gun fight. You have to be really close when you set that off and they will come after you," he said.

Pray added that wasps will often post guards outside a nest site that will attack if a nest is disturbed even slightly.

Different species of wasps, build nests in a variety of locations. The "paper" nest is the most commonly seen. Circular in shape and grey in color these nests feel like papier-mâché and are often found hanging under decks, rooflines and tree branches. But the wasps that build inside a home's wall cavity can be particularly dangerous if unchecked.

New Hampshire Businesses Come Together at the Just One Thing Sustainability Slam

By Katelyn | Oct 5, 2015 | in

AMHERST - Twelve sustainability stories by businesses from across the state will come to life at New Hampshire Businesses for Social Responsibility’s (NHBSR) Just One Thing Sustainability Slam at the LaBelle Winery on Thursday, October 15 in Amherst, New Hampshire. The evening will feature the top Just One Thing Stories, and guests will vote for the most impactful story.

NHBSR, a nonprofit membership-based organization of socially and environmentally friendly businesses, launched the Just One Thing campaign to bring together businesses from across New Hampshire to share ideas regarding sustainability and recognize businesses for their environmental, community, and workplace initiatives.

At the Sustainability Slam, guests will hear twelve winning stories, determined by a panel of sustainability experts, each in 90 seconds or less, and select the overall best stories using a polling app on their phones. Finalists were selected by a panel of experts consisting of Lisa Drake, Director of Sustainability Innovation at Stonyfield Farm, Matt Gardner, Principal of Sustainserv and Fiona Wilson, Co-Director for the Center for Social Innovation and Enterprise at the UNH Paul College of Business and Economics. Four finalists were chosen from each category, with two large companies, and two small companies or organizations in each category:

Fall Programs are in Full Swing at the Gundalow Company

By Katelyn | Oct 5, 2015 | in

With autumn well underway, tourists have packed up their beach chairs, vacated summer cottages, and headed home. As the heat of the summer slips into memory, there are still plenty of warm days left for locals to get outside and enjoy fall in New Hampshire.

One of the more popular ways to take in fall’s changing scenery is sailing along the Piscataqua River aboard a replica historic gundalow vessel, unique to the Seacoast region. The Gundalow Company, which operates regular educational and public sails, is open through the last week of October.

Established in 2002, the Gundalow Company provides a fun and educational experience for thousands of school children and adults. Today the Gundalow Company continues to carry out their mission - to protect the Piscataqua Region’s maritime heritage and environment through education and action on their newest gundalow replica, the Piscataqua.

“We built this boat for the community and want it to be thought of as a resource for local kids and families,” said Molly Bolster, Gundalow Company Executive Director.

From the early 1700s to 1900, gundalows were a common sight on the Piscataqua River and a staple of the seacoast’s economy. Gundalows evolved in style and function, adding sails, decks and cabins, and served as the primary mode of transportation for local commerce delivering raw materials up river to cotton factories and brickyards. In 2011, the Gundalow Company built the Piscataqua at Strawbery Banke, following in the footsteps of the Capt. Edward H. Adamsreplica built and launched in 1982.

Favorite Foods Continues to Lead ‘Green’ by Example

By Craig | Oct 5, 2015 | in

By Rich Collins

For the past 27 years, Favorite Foods, a New Hampshire based food distribution company, made it its mission to provide superior quality food distribution and service to their clients, typically independent restaurants, in New Hampshire, Maine, and central and northern Massachusetts. Family owned and operated by son Kelly, father Chris Barstow, and mother Petra Barstow both have always held a strong belief that Favorite Foods could run both profitably and efficiently, with a company-wide focus to improve its overall environmental footprint.

Favorite Foods has had many green successes to date, including a massive 572 Panel, 140 kW Solar installation, and the Barstow family is focused on continuously lessening their impact on the environment, increasing energy efficiencies and continuing their mission to maintain a sustainable business. Locally, Favorite Foods has had a longtime relationship with the Green Alliance, a union of local, sustainable businesses and members working to unite the green community.

The company’s latest ‘green’ effort was prompted not only by its continuous drive to improve efficiencies, but also by the realities of the significant energy use involved in large-scale refrigeration.

In order to best serve their customers, Favorite Foods relies on a large refrigerated warehouse complex located onsite in Somersworth. The building consists of industrial scale refrigerated and freezer space, and refrigerated cooled loading docks, which serve as their cold storage as well as their primary distribution center. Such a large, climate controlled space requires a significant amount of time, money, and, in particular, energy to operate. Keeping consumption and costs down benefits both the company’s sustainable mission as well as their bottom line.

Kelly Barstow, Favorite Foods’ Director of Process Improvement, began working with John Guidotti of Biotek Environmental LLC, an efficiency solutions company based in Lebanon, N.H., to audit the facility and offer suggestions to improve operations.